Below the Blue Keeps Tahoe Clean … for You!

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Throughout the great Lake Tahoe Basin, there are endless ways to enjoy the pristine waters that make our lake so famous.  But what about the Lake bottom?

Thanks to the efforts of “Below the Blue” the debris that flys off boats or are tossed into the lake does not exist like it used to.

This past week there was an excellent press release from the Tahoe Regional Planning agencies about “Below the Blue’s” efforts to clean up the lake, from its lakebed.  Here are some highlights that we thought you would enjoy reading today as posted on CarsonNow.com.

Monique Rydel-Fortner and Seth Jones have seen more of what lies underwater at Lake Tahoe than most. Unfortunately, that includes trash and lots of it — from drones, car batteries and sunken boats, to plate glass windows and enormous sheets of metal siding.

For more than a decade, the SCUBA divers and co-founders of the Tahoe-based nonprofit Below the Blue have removed more than 100,000 pounds of foreign objects from the Lake. Over countless dives, one source of submarine trash stands out as persistent but preventable — debris from shoreline building projects.

In cooperation with the League to Save Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the underwater environmentalists are working to stop the illicit practice of using Lake Tahoe as a construction site dumpster.

As noted by the co-founder of Below the Blue, Seth Jones said: “Out of sight is not out of mind.”

And our architect firm in Lake Tahoe completely agrees.

Sure, we have probably dropped our sunglasses off a pier yet to see the junk that they collect on an annual basis is just makes you think: “What were they thinking?”

Unloaded any unwanted items into the Lake is not only ‘not right,” it’s illegal.  Steve Sweet, who is the Compliance Code Program Manager at TRPA said it best:

“Discarding material of any kind in Lake Tahoe is illegal and violates the high standard of environmental stewardship in this community. Strengthening the requirements for shoreline construction permits will eliminate these careless and environmentally harmful practices to better protect Lake Tahoe.”

With Earth Day around the corner, we encourage you all to get involved in the variety of initiatives underway to keep Tahoe blue this year, and in years to come.   Click into South Tahoe Earth Day to learn more about where and when you can chip in to help in a small or significant way.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

New TRPA Forestry Efforts Give Hope to Healthier Habitats to Come

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

With memories of a summer filled with smokey skies and raging fires, residents throughout Lake Tahoe are fully-focused on efforts to keep summers like last year in the past and never to return.

Recently, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPS) Governing Board approved new policies to expedite forest revitalization programs throughout the High Sierra.  In a recent press release, they announced their plans – with the most aggressive change focusing on the change in policies about ‘ground-based’ mechanical equipment (bulldozers, etc.).  As the story noted:

The decision expands the areas where ground-based mechanical equipment can be used on steep slopes. The new policy will promote forest and ecosystem resilience to disturbances such as climate change, the agency said today.

Steep terrain can be more difficult and resource-intensive for land managers to reduce hazardous forest fuels. Prior to the update, Lake Tahoe agencies could use ground-based mechanical equipment on slopes up to a 30 percent gradient, while work on steeper slopes was limited to hand crews, pile burning, and aerial logging to protect water quality from potential erosion.

TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said, “The Caldor Fire and the surge of megafires in the region are clear directives for us to improve our forest health policies to better protect communities and the environment from wildfire. TRPA is committed to advancing science-based practices that protect the lake and bolster our resilience to ever-growing wildfire threats, especially given the need for fuels reduction work in untreated areas narrowly missed by the Caldor Fire.”

In previous years, in fact in decards, machinery was not allowed on ANY slope over 30%.  This long-standing directive dates back to our own experience here in Incline Village when the former Ski Incline transformed its resort and doubled its terrain back in 1987.  During that year, the expansion (now known as Diamond Peak) was literally built by hand.  And for those of you who have skied the upper mountain, you can only imagine how the crews had to dig the holes for the lift towers, remove vegetation, and build structures at the top of the Peak.

The story adds another visual to the challenge at hand:

The policy change will facilitate additional forest health projects on steeper slopes. Approximately 61,000 acres in the Tahoe Basin have slopes from 30 to 50 percent, and nearly half of that area is in wildland-urban interface defense and threat zones near communities where hand crews continue to work. Additionally, post-fire assessments of the Caldor Fire show that steeper slopes tended to burn at higher severity than other areas.

“This is a game-changer for fuels reduction in the basin,” Chief Scott Lindgren of Tahoe Douglas Fire Protection District said. “Hilly terrain is a significant portion of the Tahoe Basin and with the right kind of equipment, we can do quality fuel reduction work and protect the environment at the same time.”

Our team at Borelli Architecture applauds the TRPA and all who are focused on a healthier, safer, future for the entire region.  If you are interested in learning more about their year-round efforts to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

If you would like a personal insight about the TRPA, securing building permits in Tahoe, and other key initiatives that are key to starting to build a home in the Tahoe basin Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

How To Shovel Snow From Your Roof?

How to shovel snow from a roof?

With record snowfall breaking all the records for December in Lake Tahoe, our architect firm in Truckee and Lake Tahoe is getting calls about snow removal … from the roof.  Although we certainly know all about designing mountain homes that meet the structural requirements for significant snowfall like we are experienceing today, when it come to the question about how to remove snow from the rooftops, we refer our clients to professionals who know how to safely get the job done.

To help you start your own research on the subject, we found an excellent article posted on State Farm Insurance’s website.

Here are the highlights of the story posed by the question “How do you know if you have too much snow on the roof?”

One cubic foot of fluffy, dry snow weighs about three pounds. The same amount of dense, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. While most roofs are built to withstand more than that, your roof may be under too much pressure if you see these signs:

  • Visible sagging along the roofline
  • Cracks in the ceiling or on the walls
  • Popping or creaking noises
  • Difficult-to-open doors and windows

As it melts excess snow can also lead to ice dams — melting snow refreezes and can damage your home’s interior under the eave line.

How to safely clear your roof

Keep the following in mind:

  • Hire a professional. A person who does this work regularly should know the best techniques and likely be insured.
  • Never work alone. Always have someone with you in case you slip or have an emergency.
  • Clear the area. The ladder up to your roof should be positioned on solid ground. Also, make sure the rungs are clear of ice and snow before you climb.
  • Secure yourself. If possible, use a strap or belt to anchor yourself to something strong, like a chimney.
  • Avoid shingle damage. Stay away from picks, hammers, or other sharp tools to clear snow and ice.
  • Use the right tools. If you have a one-story or flat-roofed house, invest in a snow rake. These long-handled tools with plastic blades can help you gently pull snow from the edge of the roof line.

Inasmuch as this is a good recap of how to get the job done, our team at Borelli Architecture suggests you seek professionals to get the job done.  Roofing companies and possibly professional tree removal companies would be a good place to start.  Here’s a link to the Better Business Bureau’s recommendations. 

In the meantime, if you want more details about how to build a structurally sound home in the mountains, feel free to reach out at any time.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Top Tips for the Perfect Workspace and Environment

Trends in workplace design

Trends in workplace design by Borelli Architecture

Throughout the year, we like to keep our clients up to date on business and architectural design trends.  And this news posting is yet another opportunity to share a business story that was recently posted in the Reno Gazette Journal re: American’s could be working from home until spring of 2022.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have included some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.  All of which are assets that came to play within the RGJ story.

I’ll now share some of their insight (see information in italics) about workplace statistics and a few tips on how to keep the ‘art of working at home’ working for you in 2022.

How long will the ‘work from home’ directive last? 

When the coronavirus outbreak first erupted and workers were told to pack up their desks and prepare to do their jobs from home, many companies assumed they’d uphold that arrangement for a handful of weeks. Back then, no one could’ve predicted that 18 months later, a large chunk of the U.S. workforce would still be working remotely.  Earlier this summer, big-name companies started firming up plans to have staff members return to office buildings – some on a partial basis, and some on a full-time basis. But then, the delta variant hit, and since then, those same companies have had to walk back their plans and postpone their reopenings.

Facebook, for example, is delaying its office return until January of 2022. Apple initially postponed its reopening to October but has since moved it back even further to match Facebook’s timeline. And now, it’s looking like remote work easily has the potential to last two solid years.

Tips to  ‘feel right at home’ while working at home

Give yourself a break.  We have found that our team can get so focused on designing mountain homes that we forget to breathe.  As such, ew now set alarms every half hour to remind ourselves to stop and smell the roses – so to speak.  It never ceases to amaze me how a short break can help one’s mind regroup.

Save some ‘body’ time.  Within our architect design firm, we work with several of the region’s finer new communities.  And many times were are on site.  During that time, we make time to get out and take a short walk in between meetings.  Be it on the links at Clear Creek Development in Carson City or throughout the beautiful neighborhood of St. James’ Place in Reno, NV, there’s always an excellent opportunity to stretch the legs and take in the mountain scenery.

Schedule an actual lunch break.  Back in the day, when we worked in our office, there was always someone talking about where they would go for lunch.  Today, it’s a bit different as our kitchen is steps from our interior design firm and architect company in Nevada.

Get comfy, yet not too comfy.  Article after article that we read about tips for the perfect workspace and environment note that wearing sweats and t-shirts may be comfortable, they apparently have a way of making humans too lazy.  One article actually noted that the best thing to wear is pants with a tight waistband. It reminds us to keep away from the tempting snacks and daily pizza routine.

Top tips for an ideal workspace design.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have includes some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.

If you have been working from home and feel like it’s time to remodel your office, or other spaces throughout your home, our team at Borelli Architecture would be happy to share some of the ideas that we have already implemented in properties throughout Incline Village, Truckee, Lake Tahoe, and the greater Reno/Carson City region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Over 30 years ago, I started my architectural firm in Lake Tahoe.  As time went on, fortune followed as hundreds of my clients decided to leave the city life and head to the High Sierra.  Lucky for all of them, and my wife and I, we still love the decision we made so many years ago.

I was reminded of this fate while reading a story in the ‘about why Nevada is such a great place to live.  The article was written by Journalist Brett McGuinness is entitled: Why I Am Thankful to be a Nevadan. Here are some of the highlights that we thought you might enjoy reading and/or sharing with your friends and family.

Nevada is a great place to call home.  Why? Here’s what Brett had to say, as noted in the italics below.

1) Wide Open Space

More than 3 million people live in the Silver State. That’s slightly fewer residents than Iowa and slightly more than Arkansas, putting us at No. 33 out of 50 states, population-wise. Pre-pandemic numbers ranked Nevada as the third-most-visited state in the country, trailing only California and Florida. Everyone in America knows Nevada. And international tourists know us, too … mainly because of Las Vegas, but still.

2) It can be lonely, and that’s a good thing

If you love personal space, there are few spots on the planet with fewer humans than Nevada: just 28.5 people per square mile… if you were blindfolded, strapped into a parachute, and shoved out of an airplane, and your first thought upon landing is “Where is everybody?” there’s a good chance you’re in Nevada.

3) There’s a lot of ‘horsing around

If you have time, head down to the old south Reno area and poke into the neighborhoods off of NV 341 (on your way to Virginia City).  In addition to viewing some of the old architectural designs of homes built in the late 1960s and 1970s, you will likely see horses roaming around in the neighborhoods?  As Brett noted:

But how many places have wild horses hanging out on front lawns? It’s worth the occasional cleanup just so we can post horse pictures to social media and astound all our out-of-state friends.

4) Rock stars love it here

You know who’s on stage this weekend in Reno?  Multi-platinum rock group Cheap Trick, Emmy-nominated comedy writer Demetri Martin and Grammy-winning comedian Lewis Black.  Do you know who’s on stage in Mobile and Huntsville?

5) And there are endless stars to see

Because of the whole no-people-having situation, Nevada also has some of the best stargazing sites in the world. Among them are the International Dark Sky Park in northeastern Nevada’s Great Basin National Park and the Dark Sky Sanctuary at northwestern Nevada’s Massacre Rim. These sites are so free from light pollution, the stars themselves are literally bright enough to cast shadows. 

6) We’re friendly, and very tax-friendly as well

The list of reasons why one should move their family OR their business to Nevada is too long for this short news clip.  Yet for the full details, visit the Economic Development Authority of Nevada and read on!

So there you are.  If you have plans to move to Nevada and build a home, or purchase a home and need an architect to help you remodel your investment, do reach out to our team.  Our team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village and Lake Tahoe has been providing advice about the best reasons to move to Nevada for decades and would be happy to share our insight with you.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

Why the TRPA Parcel Tracker is Important to You

Mountain Home Design in Incline Village

Mountain Home Design in Incline Village

As an architectural firm that offers services above normal expectations, Borelli Architecture in Incline Village, NV, uses its collective talents and local knowledge to professionally complete each project.  Why is this important to you?

When one begins to build a home in our environmentally sensitive area, there are rules and regulations that are uniquely uncommon throughout the Tahoe Basin and its protected Watershed.  That said, long before we start to design homes for our clients, we review the property first.

Using the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s “Parcel Tracker,” we can learn all about the lot’s location and what environmental projects may affect or enhance the property’s design.  This list includes deed restrictions, land capability information, development rights associated with the parcel, and a summary of TRPA permit records.

After securing these important details, we meet with our clients to review the findings and proceed on not just the design of the home, yet these important services as well:

  • Site Planning
  • Space Planning
  • Permit Processing Assistance
  • TRPA Feasibility Studies
  • Contractor Selection and Bidding Assistance
  • Construction Administration Service

If you are thinking about buying property in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, or the Truckee Region, we will be here to help you assess your property and provide local insight into your local county and environmental regulations.

On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we look forward to sharing that insight with you.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Mountain Modern Home Designs Trending in Lake Tahoe

Mountain Modern Home Design by Borelli Architecuture in Lake Tahoe

 

Mountain Modern Home Design by Borelli Architecuture in Lake Tahoe

As the world seems to be flocking to the High Sierra for all the right reasons, our designers at Borelli Architecture are seeing a dramatic increase in the appeal of the Mountain Modern home design in and around Lake Tahoe.

Right now, we are working on a project in the higher elevation of the prestigious community of Incline  Village, NV.  The photo pictured above is the rendering of a 4,600 square foot contemporary residence. In addition to the spectacular lake views, the property affords a setting that deserves expansive windows and natural exterior materials that include cedar siding, Ledgeston, and standing seam metal roofing.

The inside reflects the owners’ desires to live a comfortable, year-round lifestyle.  Located on the lower floor is a large, two-story kitchen/dining/living area that opens up to a partially covered outdoor living area. The master bedroom suite and den are also located on the lower floor.

Upstairs was carefully planned and designed for company – which is a must when you live in one of the most beautiful places on the planet!

The upper floor has three guest bedroom suites, a kid’s bunkroom/TV room, and a workout room that can also double as a guest bedroom suite.

If you are thinking about building or remodeling a home in the mountains, and have a specific interest to locate an architect firm in Lake Tahoe that designs mountain modern homes, we welcome the opportunity to show you our portfolio.

Feel free to reach out at any time for a complimentary consultation.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Real Estate Investors Find New TRPA ADU Program A Big Benefit

Architecture firm in Lake Tahoe

Looking for new and creative ways to invest in real estate? This is a concept that is worth reviewing.

Throughout the past few years,and last year in particular, the Lake Tahoe Basin has experienced tremendous growth of full-time residents.  For local business owners, one would think that is a good trend.  The other side of the story is the fact that a lot of the affordable housing that used to be good rentals for the workforce are now home to our new residents.

Realizing the crunch and need for more affordable options, and to help those businesses retain good employees, the Tahoe Regional Transportation agency has just released a new incentive program to entice investors to remodel their homes in Lake Tahoe or build new affordable housing.

At our architecture firm in Washoe County, based in Incline Village, NV, we applaud the TRPA for stepping up and offering incentives for those who are interested in supporting this new Accessory Dwelling Unit incentive.

For those not a familiar with ADUs, they are usually is a smaller, independent residential dwelling unit located on the same lot as a stand-alone (i.e., detached) single-family home. ADUs go by many different names throughout the U.S., including accessory apartments, secondary suites, and granny flats.

Those who are interested in investing in real estate within the Lake Tahoe Basin may want to consider this program.

The official press announcement from the TRPA follows.  And if you have any questions about how to get started to remodel your home to accommodate an ADU, or purchase existing real estate or land to build ADU’s, feel free to contact us at Borelli Architecture in Lake Tahoe, NV.

New TRPA Incentive A Bonus for Real Estate Investors

[Story courtesy of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency]

Updated rules to encourage more affordable housing options for Tahoe residents and workers have been unanimously approved by the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPA) Governing Board, the agency said today.

The approval significantly expands the number of properties in the Tahoe Basin that can add an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) and provides further incentives if the ADU is restricted to affordable rates and located near transit or a town center, which reduces vehicle use. Now in most of the region, single-family residential parcels of any size can apply to add or create an ADU, among other changes. The previous rule only allowed ADUs on parcels of 1-acre or more. The amendments maintain the 1-acre size limit in the Washoe and Douglas county portions of the basin, which is consistent with local jurisdiction rules.

Under the new regional rules and under California state law, new ADUs can only be rented for 30 days or more, which addresses concerns that new home apartments or mother-in-law units could be used for short-term rentals. Around the nation, accessory dwelling units are being encouraged as one solution to increasing the supply of workforce housing.

“Lake Tahoe’s sustainability relies on a healthy environment and strong communities and the housing crisis is hurting everyone,” TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said. “These amendments are an important part of a larger, collaborative initiative to solve housing problems in the Lake Tahoe Region. This is a good first step and we will continue to partner with local jurisdictions and housing partners to meet local and regional housing needs.”

Other amendments approved by the TRPA Board allow motel units being redeveloped to change from tourist accommodation use to residential use. Currently, in some cases, this type of redevelopment is limited to tourist accommodation only.

These initial amendments were developed with input from the Tahoe Living Workforce Housing and Community Revitalization Working Group, an advisory group of non-profit, social service, environmental, real estate and local government representatives. The working group will continue to develop recommendations that further incentivize affordable and workforce units.

The new rules take effect 60 days after the July 29th approval and the application process is under development. More information is available at trpa.gov/adus/.

The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency leads the cooperative effort to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment. For additional information, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

We look forward to assisting you with any needs/interest you may have in our architectural design services in Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV.

 

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How to Get Trees Removed from Your Property in Tahoe

Tree Removal at Lake Tahoe

Within our last blog we provided you with details on how to prepare your home for wildfire season.  Within a week’s time, we received calls at our architecture firm in Incline Village and North Lake Tahoe as to how to get trees removed from property.  So we did a little research.  The following information was gleaned from the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency website – to which we will give full credit for the content.  In addition to the details below, there is lots of information on their site to help you be a good steward of the land.

When it comes to securing a permit to build your home, or other environmental requirements that are mandated with the Tahoe Basin, our team at Borelli Architect firm in Lake Tahoe and Carson City provides that service to you.  For a complete list of the benefits that come with working with our team, click into our website right here.

In the meantime, here are the specifics as to how to get trees removed from your property with the Basin.

When is a tree removal permit needed?

Tree Size

A permit is required to remove live trees greater than 14 inches diameter at breast height (DBH) as long as the house is not along the lakeshore.

If the house is along the lakeshore, a permit is required to remove trees greater than 6 inches DBH between the house and the lake. Trees not between the house and the lake only need a tree removal permit if they are live trees greater than 14 inches DBH.

Trees of any size that were planted or retained as part of a permit, or that are in a Stream Environment Zone or backshore area, require a permit for removal. The backshore area is the sensitive area adjacent to the Lake.

Dead Trees

Removal of a dead tree that could fall on a house does not require a permit. A conifer is considered to be dead when it doesn’t have any green needles. A deciduous tree must be determined to be dead by a qualified forester.  To remove a dead tree that isn’t near a house, contact a TRPA forester to determine if a permit is required.

Substantial Trimming

A permit is required for removal of branches from the upper 2/3 of the total height of the tree, unless the branch:

  • Is within 10 feet of a chimney outlet, building or deck
  • Is rubbing or pulling on utility lines within your property boundary (always consult your power company before removing branches near utility lines)
  • Is dead

Sensitive Areas

Any manipulation of live vegetation within SEZs or the backshore of Lake Tahoe, including trees and shrubs, requires TRPA review.

Construction Projects

Trees that are permitted for removal as part of a development project do not need a separate tree removal permit.

How to Determine DBH

DBH stands for “diameter at breast height.” Breast height is 4.5 feet off the ground, measured on the uphill side of the tree. Measure around the outside of the tree at breast height to determine the circumference, and then divide that number by 3.14 to get the diameter. A tree with a diameter of 14 inches has a circumference of 43.9 inches.

In conclusion, never hesitate to contact our architecture and design firm in Tahoe.  We have lived and worked in the Basin for over 30 years and would be happy to answer any questions you may have about mountain home design or the numerous regulations that you need to adhere to when you are ready to build or remodel your home in Lake Tahoe.

 

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Fire Prevention Tips – Living with Fire

 

With an extremely low snow year behind us, fire prevention and preparation is top of mind for all of us who live in the Tahoe Basin.

In an effort to help us all be prepared, I am sharing a blog from last year that is just as relevant, if not more so, this year.

The following article  written by Tia Rancourt, Public Education/Information Officer, for the North Lake Tahoe Fire District.  If you would like more information, please contact her directly at 775-813-8106, trancourt@nltfpd.net

WEATHER & FIRE SAFETY INFORMATION – PREPARING FOR FIRE EVACUATION

As we have been experiencing lately, fires started by lightning peak in the summer months and in the late afternoon and early evening. Know what to do to keep you and your family safe when storms strike.

  • If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance of lightning. Look for shelter inside a home, large building, or a hard-topped vehicle right away.
  • Do not go under trees for shelter. There is no place outside that is safe during a thunderstorm.
  • Wait at least 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder before leaving your shelter.
  • Stay away from windows and doors. Stay off porches.
  • There is no safe place outside. Places with only a roof on sports fields, golf courses, and picnic areas are not safe during a lightning storm. Small sheds should not be used.
  • If a person is struck by lightning, call 9-1-1. Get medical help right away.

Facts & figures from National Fire Protection Association:

  • During 2007-2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 22,600 fires started by lightning. These fires caused annual averages of
    • 9 civilian deaths
    • 53 civilian injuries
    • $451 million in direct property damage
  • Fires started by lightning peak in the summer months and in the late afternoon and early evening.
  • For more information on lightning safety please visit www.nfpa.org.

Please keep in mind that with the drier than normal conditions this summer, it is important to create and maintain defensible space around your home. Visit tahoelivingwithfire.com for more information and “Fight fire with a plan.”

Prepare your family, property, and possessions now before a wildfire starts by creating a plan:

  • Develop a family evacuation plan
  • Create and maintain defensible space
  • Assemble a Go-bag and a disaster supply kit for your home and vehicle
  • Sign up for emergency notifications for residents and visitors and stay informed
  • Reduce the threat of wildfire by learning about embers and how to harden your home.

If you plan on water recreation activities on Lake Tahoe, please remember the temperature can be colder than most, as it is an Alpine lake. Whether boating, jet skiing, kayaking, rafting, paddle boarding or swimming, it is important to inform yourself about the colder temperatures and the forecasted weather as it can change very quickly, please visit National Weather Service.

On behalf of our entire team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village on Lake Tahoe’s North Shore, we encourage you to take preventative measures as noted above.  Be safe.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060