How to Safely Shovel Snow Off A Roof

how to safely clear snow from a roof

how to safely clear snow from a roof

With all the recent snowfall, our architectural firm at Lake Tahoe has been receiving calls about snow loads on our clients’ roofs.  Within that conversation, they ask how to safely remove the load – as there is more snow in the forecast this month.

Last year, we posted one of our most popular blogs about how we design mountain homes that meet the structural requirements for significant snowfall.  And within the blog, we offered immediate advice as to how one can know if there is too much snow on the roof, and how to safely remove the snow.  With the heavy snow that we received during Christmas and New Year’s, we thought we should share that advice again.

Here are the highlights of the story posed by the question “How do you know if you have too much snow on the roof?”

One cubic foot of fluffy, dry snow weighs about three pounds. The same amount of dense, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. While most roofs are built to withstand more than that, your roof may be under too much pressure if you see these signs:

  • Visible sagging along the roofline
  • Cracks in the ceiling or on the walls
  • Popping or creaking noises
  • Difficult-to-open doors and windows

As it melts excess snow can also lead to ice dams — melting snow refreezes and can damage your home’s interior under the eave line.

How to safely clear your roof

Keep the following in mind:

  • Hire a professional. A person who does this work regularly should know the best techniques and likely be insured.
  • Never work alone. Always have someone with you in case you slip or have an emergency.
  • Clear the area. The ladder up to your roof should be positioned on solid ground. Also, make sure the rungs are clear of ice and snow before you climb.
  • Secure yourself. If possible, use a strap or belt to anchor yourself to something strong, like a chimney.
  • Avoid shingle damage. Stay away from picks, hammers, or other sharp tools to clear snow and ice.
  • Use the right tools. If you have a one-story or flat-roofed house, invest in a snow rake. These long-handled tools with plastic blades can help you gently pull snow from the edge of the roof line.

Inasmuch as this is a good recap of how to get the job done, our team at Borelli Architecture suggests you seek professionals to get the job done.  Roofing companies and possibly professional tree removal companies would be a good place to start.  Here’s a link to the Better Business Bureau’s recommendations. 

In the meantime, if you want more details about how to build a structurally sound home in the mountains, feel free to reach out at any time.

Be safe out there!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Incline Village Curbside Chipping, Pine Needle Pickup, Deadlines Approaching

Tree Chipping Services in Lake Tahoe

Tree Chipping Services in Lake Tahoe

During the year, our team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village likes to provide information about living in the mountains and tips to keep your home safe in your natural surroundings. During the fall season, Kelly and I make it a point to clean up our yard and prepare for the winter months to come.

Another bonus of living in the high-elevation wrapped within a forest setting is the free services we receive from various local agencies and organizations.

Read on to see the details about Incline Village Waste Management’s Yard Waste pick-up service and the North Lake Tahoe Protection District’s curbside chipping services.

Next, get your yard and piles in order.

  • Clean up all the fallen leaves and perhaps limbs or tree debris accumulated over the summer months.
  • Pine needles and clean yard waste should be placed in large trash bags; place your Waste Management stickers on each load and put them on the curb for pick-up (now through October 28). If you did not get your stickers from Waste Management, or have more questions, see all the details about Incline’s Yard Waste Management Program right here. 

Next, take advantage of the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District FREE curbside chipping service if you have branches too big for your regular trash containers. Sign up on this form to make a request.

Then, prepare your curbside piles:

  • All branches The branch diameter cannot exceed 6 inches.
  • The pile must not contain stumps, roots, garbage, nails, lumber, or pine cones.
  • The pile must not exceed 30 feet in length, 6 feet in height, and 6 feet in width.

Repurpose the chips:

Once the chipping has been completed, they will be left right where you left your pile and are ideal for erosion control or natural landscaping. Do note that WHERE you place the clipping is essential as well. The NLTFPD suggests that you keep the chippings AT LEAST five feet away from your home or any structure.

Information on their website also noted that if you spread the chips within 30 feet of a structure, you should be sure they are separated by ‘noncombustible’ areas like rock, pathways, driveways, or dirt.

After you do all the hard work, take time to enjoy the fall season. It will be snowing before you know it!

We hope this information helps you and your family prepare and plan for the winter months. For more tips, visit the blog we posted last fall about Home Winter Preparation Tips. And, if you ever need more insight into what it is like to live in the mountains or need a professional architect in Lake Tahoe to help build your mountain, lakefront, or golf resort home at Lake Tahoe, feel free to reach out at any time.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Best in Basin Awards Announced by TRPA

TRPA Best in Basin Awards

TRPA Best in Basin Awards

Every year the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency presents its Best in Basin Awards” that mirror their mission:

To preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, while improving local communities, and people’s interactions with our irreplaceable environment.

This past month, they rolled out the red carpet and presented their annual accolades to the following companies.  At our architect firm in Lake Tahoe, we applaud our peers for a job well done!

The nomination period for these awards spanned two years due to delays related to the region’s Covid response. The Best in the Basin Award recipients for 2020 and 2021 are as follows:

Best Water Quality & Restoration Projects

Tahoe Pines Restoration and Public Access Improvement Project
Meyers, Calif.
By California Tahoe Conservancy, Burdick Excavation Company, and Stantec Engineering

Brautovich Park Stream Environment Zone Restoration and Park Rehabilitation Project
Upper Kingsbury Grade, Stateline, Nev.
By Douglas County and Nevada Tahoe Conservation District, Design Workshop, and Impact Construction

Best Water Quality Best Management Practices (BMPs)

Incline Village Golf Course Maintenance Drainage and Wash Pad Improvement Project
Incline Village, Nev.
By Incline Village General Improvement District Public Works, PR Design and Engineering, Inc., and Cruz Construction Co.

Best Environmental Improvement Program Projects

Dennis T. Machida Greenway Memorial Trail
South Lake Tahoe, Calif.
By El Dorado County Department of Transportation, California Tahoe Conservancy, City of South Lake Tahoe, Lake Tahoe Community College, and Herback General Engineering

Eyes on the Lake – Aquatic Invasive Species Early Detection Rapid Response
Lake Tahoe, Calif./Nev.
By the League to Save Lake Tahoe, Tahoe Resource Conservation District, and Marine Taxonomic Services, Inc.

Best Defensible Space and Forest Health Project

NV Energy Resilient Corridor 4100 Line Project
North and East shores, Lake Tahoe, Nev.
By NV Energy and North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District

Best Sustainability Action

Homewood High and Dry Marina Electric Boat Charging
Homewood, Calif.
By JMA Ventures, LLC, Homewood High and Dry Marina, Nautique, Superior Boat Repairs & Service, Ingenity Electric, and the Tahoe Fund

Nominations for the next awards will open late next year and will be for projects completed in 2022 and 2023, according to TRPA. Additional information is available at trpa.gov/how-we-operate/awards.

If you want to learn more about the high-quality standards and environmental regulations that one must employ while designing and building private and commercial properties, please contact us at any time.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Wildfire Home Preparedness Tips (Part Two)

Fire safe houses

Fire safe houses

Earlier this month we started to provide you with some of the best tips to prepare your home for fire season and keep it safe from embers and flames all year long.  It was a popular post.  So much so, our team at Borelli Architecture in Lake Tahoe and Incline Village decided to continue the theme on your behalf.

Before we dive in, we want to thank the professional educators at the University of Nevada Extension for providing this excellent information.

Vents

Embers are enemies of vents in homes that often lead to open spaces with your roofing or attic.  Here are some tips to follow:

  • Avoid storing anything combustible in your attic re: cardboard boxes, leftover construction, newspapers
  • Inspect those vents before fire season; check the screens and seals
  • Consider replacing vents with ember-resistant options

Home Siding

As designers and architects of mountain homes in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and the Truckee region, we always recommend only the safest and most secure materials for your home.  This section outlines options siding.

First and foremost, it is NOT recommended to use fire-retardant coatings like fire-retardant paint.  What you want to use is non-combustible products like stucco, steel and fiber cement siding options.

Our team at Borelli Architecture in Washoe County, we also recommend the use of a one-hour wall design with a fire-resistant zone.

Skylights

In as much as skylights offer natural light throughout the house, they can be the entry for embers and flames if the covers are not sealed well.  If you want them designed into your home, we suggest the flat-style v/s domed design. Metal is the only choice in our minds as the plastic style will melt and burn upon contact.

Many skylights are designed to open to bring in the fresh Sierra air.  If a wildfire comes unexpectedly, you might not have time to close them.  Stay ahead and prepare those windows with 1/16 inch non-combustible corrosion-resistant-metal mesh screening.

Window

Now that we have addressed skylights, let’s take a look at windows.  To reduce the vulnerability, look at these tips for the best options for fire-prone regions.

  • Chose multi-pane openings containing tempered glass
  • It does hurt to also invest in non-combustible shutters to provide extra protection.
  • Purchase windows that have screens as they serve as additional ‘guards’ for flying embers.

Fences

This is a pretty obvious one, yet we did not want to leave this section out of our tips to prevent a home from wildfire.  If your fence is made of combustible material, replace it completely.  Or at least replace the combustible section closest to the home with metal or non-combustible options.

And, as pretty as it is to have ivy or flowering vines growing on your fence, the experts at UNR Extension suggest that you opt not to do this.

We want to take this time to thank the University of Nevada, Reno Extension, College of Agriculture for proving this information to you.  For more insight about how to prepare and keep your home safe from fire, visit www.unr.edu/avrs.

 

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

How to Make A Family Emergency Preparedness Plan

Emergency Preparedness Resources

 

Emergency Preparedness Resources

Over the past few years, the Lake Tahoe region has experienced some of the most devastating forest fires.  With summer around the corner, our team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village researched ideas on what you can do in advance to prepare you, your home, and your family ahead of time.

Thanks to the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District, there is a wealth of information online.  Throughout our next few News articles, we are going to share some of their most valuable resources.

This first Edition comes from their Emergency Preparedness Brochure, General Emergency Preparedness section.

GET INFORMED & MAKE A FAMILY PLAN

In our area, we have the potential for disasters caused by earthquakes, wildland fires, and weather-related emergencies. Take time to plan for the problems related to each type of disaster.

If you have pets, make a pet plan. Animals may not be allowed inside emergency shelters due to health regulations.

Find out how to help elderly or disabled persons in your home or neighborhood.

Ask about disaster plans at your workplace, your children’s school or daycare center, and other places where your family spends time.

MAKE A FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN

Meet with household members — Explain the dangers to children and your emergency plans. Work with them as a team to prepare your family to deal with emergencies.

Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.

Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.

Learn how to turn off the water, gas and electricity at your home.

Decide where to meet — In the event of an emergency, you may become
separated from family members. Choose a place right outside your home in case
of a sudden emergency, like a fire. Choose a location outside your neighborhood
in case you cannot return home.

Choose an “Out-of-Town” contact — Ask an out-of-town friend or relative to be
your contact in the event of a disaster. Everyone must know the contact’s phone
number. It is often easier to make a long-distance phone call than a local call from
a disaster area. Teach children how to make long-distance telephone calls.

Complete a family communications plan – Your plan should include contact
information for family members, work, and school.

In a fire or other emergency, you may need to evacuate very quickly. Be ready to get out fast. Be sure everyone in your family
knows the best escape routes out of your home as well as where the safe places are in your home for each type of disaster. Draw a Home Family Escape Plan with your family outlining two escape routes from each room.

Schools will soon be closing for the summer, which makes now an ideal time to set aside time to make your own family emergency plans. We encourage you to do so, soon, and wish you a safe and memorable summer to come.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

New Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe Now Open

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

(Photo courtesy of Clear Creek Tahoe and Chase International – Listing Real Estate Office)

On behalf of Borelli Architecture firm at Lake Tahoe and Carson City, Nevada, we are sending out our congratulations to our friends at Clear Creek Tahoe in Carson City.  This past month they announced the Grand Opening of their new 20,000 SF Clubhouse.

In a recent article in the Tahoe Daily Tribune, General Manager Milward Bell-Bhatti quoted:

“Now more than ever, our community seeks connection, and we couldn’t be more excited to introduce the Clear Creek Clubhouse to meet this need. We focused on the pillars that set our community apart, from culinary to wellness and golf, with spaces appropriately both grand and intimate to celebrate life in the mountains and provides a legacy environment for our members active Tahoe lifestyle.”

If you have ever wanted to live a life that included year-round recreation steps from your porch, this prestigious development on the eastern edge of the High Sierra offers its own golf course and private beach house on the edge of Lake Tahoe.  In addition, the new Clubhouse offers the following features and amenities:

Highlights of the new Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe include:

  • A stone hearth and fireplace —the ideal spot to warm up
  • Outdoor dining areas, complete with a fire pit and stunning views
  • Terraces for lounging that overlook our beautiful golf course with dramatic rock outcroppings in the background
  • A welcoming dining room complete with fireplace and vaulted windows that overlooks the 18th green and the Event Lawn
  • A pub and lounge just off the dining room for light snacks, cocktails, and that all-important recap of the day’s golf game
  • Fitness room with the latest cardio equipment and weights, a movement studio, a spin studio, and a refreshment station
  • Locker rooms thoughtfully designed around gathering and socializing, with generous wet areas and steam rooms
  • Single and couples’ treatment rooms for massage and other body work

At this time, Borelli Architecture is designing several homes within the resort and is in contract with a few other residents who have chosen to live a full and active life at Clear Creek.

Lots are still available for sale – yet there are not many left to purchase.

If you would like a personal tour of what is, without question, THE place to work or retire, I would be happy to show you the options at any time. Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in the Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How To Shovel Snow From Your Roof?

How to shovel snow from a roof?

With record snowfall breaking all the records for December in Lake Tahoe, our architect firm in Truckee and Lake Tahoe is getting calls about snow removal … from the roof.  Although we certainly know all about designing mountain homes that meet the structural requirements for significant snowfall like we are experienceing today, when it come to the question about how to remove snow from the rooftops, we refer our clients to professionals who know how to safely get the job done.

To help you start your own research on the subject, we found an excellent article posted on State Farm Insurance’s website.

Here are the highlights of the story posed by the question “How do you know if you have too much snow on the roof?”

One cubic foot of fluffy, dry snow weighs about three pounds. The same amount of dense, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. While most roofs are built to withstand more than that, your roof may be under too much pressure if you see these signs:

  • Visible sagging along the roofline
  • Cracks in the ceiling or on the walls
  • Popping or creaking noises
  • Difficult-to-open doors and windows

As it melts excess snow can also lead to ice dams — melting snow refreezes and can damage your home’s interior under the eave line.

How to safely clear your roof

Keep the following in mind:

  • Hire a professional. A person who does this work regularly should know the best techniques and likely be insured.
  • Never work alone. Always have someone with you in case you slip or have an emergency.
  • Clear the area. The ladder up to your roof should be positioned on solid ground. Also, make sure the rungs are clear of ice and snow before you climb.
  • Secure yourself. If possible, use a strap or belt to anchor yourself to something strong, like a chimney.
  • Avoid shingle damage. Stay away from picks, hammers, or other sharp tools to clear snow and ice.
  • Use the right tools. If you have a one-story or flat-roofed house, invest in a snow rake. These long-handled tools with plastic blades can help you gently pull snow from the edge of the roof line.

Inasmuch as this is a good recap of how to get the job done, our team at Borelli Architecture suggests you seek professionals to get the job done.  Roofing companies and possibly professional tree removal companies would be a good place to start.  Here’s a link to the Better Business Bureau’s recommendations. 

In the meantime, if you want more details about how to build a structurally sound home in the mountains, feel free to reach out at any time.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Top Tips for the Perfect Workspace and Environment

Trends in workplace design

Trends in workplace design by Borelli Architecture

Throughout the year, we like to keep our clients up to date on business and architectural design trends.  And this news posting is yet another opportunity to share a business story that was recently posted in the Reno Gazette Journal re: American’s could be working from home until spring of 2022.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have included some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.  All of which are assets that came to play within the RGJ story.

I’ll now share some of their insight (see information in italics) about workplace statistics and a few tips on how to keep the ‘art of working at home’ working for you in 2022.

How long will the ‘work from home’ directive last? 

When the coronavirus outbreak first erupted and workers were told to pack up their desks and prepare to do their jobs from home, many companies assumed they’d uphold that arrangement for a handful of weeks. Back then, no one could’ve predicted that 18 months later, a large chunk of the U.S. workforce would still be working remotely.  Earlier this summer, big-name companies started firming up plans to have staff members return to office buildings – some on a partial basis, and some on a full-time basis. But then, the delta variant hit, and since then, those same companies have had to walk back their plans and postpone their reopenings.

Facebook, for example, is delaying its office return until January of 2022. Apple initially postponed its reopening to October but has since moved it back even further to match Facebook’s timeline. And now, it’s looking like remote work easily has the potential to last two solid years.

Tips to  ‘feel right at home’ while working at home

Give yourself a break.  We have found that our team can get so focused on designing mountain homes that we forget to breathe.  As such, ew now set alarms every half hour to remind ourselves to stop and smell the roses – so to speak.  It never ceases to amaze me how a short break can help one’s mind regroup.

Save some ‘body’ time.  Within our architect design firm, we work with several of the region’s finer new communities.  And many times were are on site.  During that time, we make time to get out and take a short walk in between meetings.  Be it on the links at Clear Creek Development in Carson City or throughout the beautiful neighborhood of St. James’ Place in Reno, NV, there’s always an excellent opportunity to stretch the legs and take in the mountain scenery.

Schedule an actual lunch break.  Back in the day, when we worked in our office, there was always someone talking about where they would go for lunch.  Today, it’s a bit different as our kitchen is steps from our interior design firm and architect company in Nevada.

Get comfy, yet not too comfy.  Article after article that we read about tips for the perfect workspace and environment note that wearing sweats and t-shirts may be comfortable, they apparently have a way of making humans too lazy.  One article actually noted that the best thing to wear is pants with a tight waistband. It reminds us to keep away from the tempting snacks and daily pizza routine.

Top tips for an ideal workspace design.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have includes some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.

If you have been working from home and feel like it’s time to remodel your office, or other spaces throughout your home, our team at Borelli Architecture would be happy to share some of the ideas that we have already implemented in properties throughout Incline Village, Truckee, Lake Tahoe, and the greater Reno/Carson City region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Examples of Homes with Remodeled Gas and Wood Stoves

Wood and Gas Stove Remodeling Tips

Every year at Borelli Architecture, we seem to have clients who seek our ideas on how to remodel their homes to upgrade their gas or wood stoves.   As this is a popular subject, and with winter already in full focus at Lake Tahoe, we decided to share some of the h0mes we have remodeled to include an upgraded wood and/or gas stove.

Below you will find a few examples.

Wood and Gas Stove Remodeling Tips

Wood Stove Upgrade, Remodeled Lakefront Home

In the far corner of this lakefront property, you will see a classic old wood stove that served its purpose for many years.  Within the larger photo, you can see what a beautiful difference a home remodel can make to the ambiance, as well as the value, of this Crystal Shores condominium in Incline Village, NV.  Our Borelli Architecture firm in Lake Tahoe worked with our clients to ensure their vision of a “living room with a mountain style” came to life.

To see additional photographs of this lakefront home remodel in Lake Tahoe, follow this link.

Gas Stove Remodel Ideas

Here is another fine example.  In the photo on the far left corner, you can see that there was no fireplace at all.  Through our architectural design services in Tahoe, we completely changed the ambiance of this home on Dee Court in Incline Village.  The gas fireplace is now a centerpiece of the Great Room which serves as the main gathering area for the family during the winter months, and all year long.

For more insight about the other rooms that we remodeled throughout this home in Incline Village, click on our website now.

Fireplace Remodeling Ideas

Above you will see one more example of what a simple home remodel can make when you include a cozy gas (or wood) fireplace.  The owners of this condominium in Incline Village selected this fireplace for two reasons:  warmth, and as an accent to their mountain-themed living room.

So where do you start to find the best selection of gas or wood stoves in Lake Tahoe?  First and foremost, we always encourage our clients to “Keep the money on the mountain” for whatever they are looking for.  When it comes to stoves?  Go see Randy at Woodstove Distributors on the main drag in Incline Village.

When you are ready to take a look at all the options that are out in the market for replacing your wood or gas stove, and thinking about a home remodel in Lake Tahoe, feel free to reach out to Borelli Architecture to get your vision underway.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How To Get A Permit to Build A Boat Dock or Buoy Mooring in Lake Tahoe

This past year it seems like the world moved to Lake Tahoe to enjoy the lifestyle that comes with living and working throughout the High Sierra.  Within this ‘dream-like lifestyle,’ comes visions of working in the morning and heading out on the Lake for an afternoon of wake surfing or waterskiing.

As one who has lived here for over 30 years, and designed lakefront homes at Lake Tahoe, this lifestyle is real and very doable.

However, slipping out onto the crystal clear waters from your own boat dock doesn’t come easy for those who have purchased a Lakefront home and want to add a pier and/or buoy mooring just outside of one’s home office.  Living within the Lake Tahoe Watershed comes with from pretty stringent rules – all for good reasons – to keep the Lake as pristine as it is today.

To secure a permit to build a boat dock or get a mooring is like winning the lottery, yet can be done.

Within the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s website is a section that will help you to better understand the steps one must take to POSSIBLY secure a permit to build your dream dock.  Here are some highlights from their website.

All moorings including buoys, boat lifts, and boat slips are subject to annual registration fees paid through this system. New moorings require a TRPA permit and existing moorings must be registered and/or permitted through the Phase 1 process below.

Allocation of New Moorings

As part of the Shoreline Plan, TRPA may permit up to a maximum of 2,116 additional (new) moorings. Allowable moorings include buoys, boat lifts, and boat slips and are distributed through the following pools:

  • 1,486 private moorings (buoys or boat lifts)
  • 330 marina moorings (buoys or boat slips)
  • 300 public agency moorings (buoys or boat slips)

New mooring allocations will be released in accordance with TRPA Code of Ordinances 84.3.2.E.4: a maximum of fifteen (15) percent of the available moorings from each of the three pools can be allocated annually.

Eligibility Criteria

Private moorings

Single-family parcels:

  • Up to two moorings per parcel; existing moorings count towards maximum moorings allowed
  • Littoral – single-family parcel must adjoin or abut the high water elevation of Lake Tahoe
  • Best Management Practices (BMPs) Certificate – The littoral parcel must have a BMP Certificate of Completion prior to entering the mooring lottery. You can check the BMP compliance status on the TRPA Parcel Tracker. For more information on BMPs or to request assistance from TRPA’s Stormwater Management Program, please visit tahoebmp.org or call the BMP hotline at (775) 589-5202.

In addition, private moorings must comply with all eligibility, capacity, mitigation, development and location standards of TRPA Code of Ordinances Chapters 80-85, which include, but are not limited to:

  • Located outside a Stream-mouth Protection Zone
  • Boat lifts: one per parcel on an existing pier, up to four
  • Mooring buoys:
    • At least 50 feet from another mooring buoy (50-foot grid spacing for buoy fields)
    • At least 20 feet from adjacent littoral parcel projection line boundaries
    • Buoys not in buoy fields: No greater than 600 feet lakeward from elevation 6,220 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, as measured horizontally, or no farther lakeward than elevation 6,210 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, whichever is less
    • Buoy fields: No greater than 600 feet lakeward from elevation 6,220 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, as measured horizontally, and does not exceed the maximum buoy field size (derived from littoral HOA parcel dimensions)
On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we are here to help you build the home of your dreams, be it on the lake, golf course, or high atop the High Sierra.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060