What is a Site Plan and Why Do You Need One?

Lakefront Home Designs

When you live in one of the most beautiful spots on the planet, you have an innate ability to appreciate your surroundings and protect them as best as you can.  When working with our clients, we offer professional Site Plan services that enhance your property’s setting while abiding by the strict environmental regulations set by the counties around the Lake and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency – for all the right reasons.

We employ a proactive approach regarding communications with both regulatory officials and interested stakeholders in order to build consensus surrounding a project’s design and objectives. Applying our collective talents and experience, Borelli Architecture in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, is here to design your dream home while ensuring we protect the environment that surrounds your investment.

When you work with the team at Borelli Architecture in Lake Tahoe and Carson City, Nevada, you will receive a visual presentation of your property that includes:

  • location of your home
  • location of other buildings (guest house, garden sheds)
  • terraces
  • extended features (outdoor kitchen, firepit)
  • playground

When completed, you will have a much better visual of the size and scale of your home as it relates to its orientation on your property.

Your site plan may be presented in different formats.

2D Site Plan  This is usually a simple overview that may be black and white or color coded.  It’s usually the first step in your home design which gives you an initial understanding of the layout of your home.

3D Site Plan  This option is more elaborate and includes a more defined full-color understanding of the structure of your home and its materials and colors, as well as some outdoor features (potential trees, etc.)

 3D Video Our team prefers this option and uses this technology to give our clients a much clearer understanding of your site plan, house plan, and environment in which it will be built.

For example, take a tour through our Borelli Architecture Video Models now.

If you have any questions at any time about our services to help you visualize your next home, please reach out at any time.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How to Secure Permits to Build a Home in Lake Tahoe? (Part One)

TRPA Permit

 

If you have recently purchased land or a home in the Lake Tahoe basin and have plans to either build a home or do an extensive remodel, our team at Borelli Architecture based in Incline Village Lake Tahoe is here to help you move forward in planning for your future.  Throughout the last 30 years, we have been working closely with the agencies and counties that fall within the Lake Tahoe Basin area and have strict policies that must be followed.

As a full-service architectural design firm, we certainly can assist in designing the home of your dreams.  In addition, we have solid relationships with the individuals who review and approve the many permits that it takes to finalize a home in the Lake Tahoe Basin, and outlying Carson City and Truckee regions as well.

Below you will find a list from the TRPA website that will provide you with an overview of the various applications and forms that may be required to complete, submit, and receive approval before and during the permitting, home building and renovation processes.

Take a look at this list below.

Then, check back into our News section at Borelli Architecture at the end of this month to learn more about the permitting process to build or remodel a home within the High Sierra.

Single Family Dwelling Application @

Single Family Dwelling Findings

BMP Retrofit Permit Application @

BMP Small Retrofit Plan@

Driveway/Parking Area Paving Application @

Grading Project Application @

Land Coverage Exemptions for Residential Improvements

Backup Generator Installation Guide 

Multi-Family Dwelling Application @

Multi-Family Dwelling Project Findings

Qualified Exempt Declaration @

Scenic Protection Information

Wood Heater Retrofit Statement Form @

Construction Schedule Extension @

Historic Resource Determination @

If you have any questions, at any time about building, designing, or securing permits for your new home, please reach out at any time.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Wildfire Home Preparedness Tips (Part Two)

Fire safe houses

Fire safe houses

Earlier this month we started to provide you with some of the best tips to prepare your home for fire season and keep it safe from embers and flames all year long.  It was a popular post.  So much so, our team at Borelli Architecture in Lake Tahoe and Incline Village decided to continue the theme on your behalf.

Before we dive in, we want to thank the professional educators at the University of Nevada Extension for providing this excellent information.

Vents

Embers are enemies of vents in homes that often lead to open spaces with your roofing or attic.  Here are some tips to follow:

  • Avoid storing anything combustible in your attic re: cardboard boxes, leftover construction, newspapers
  • Inspect those vents before fire season; check the screens and seals
  • Consider replacing vents with ember-resistant options

Home Siding

As designers and architects of mountain homes in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and the Truckee region, we always recommend only the safest and most secure materials for your home.  This section outlines options siding.

First and foremost, it is NOT recommended to use fire-retardant coatings like fire-retardant paint.  What you want to use is non-combustible products like stucco, steel and fiber cement siding options.

Our team at Borelli Architecture in Washoe County, we also recommend the use of a one-hour wall design with a fire-resistant zone.

Skylights

In as much as skylights offer natural light throughout the house, they can be the entry for embers and flames if the covers are not sealed well.  If you want them designed into your home, we suggest the flat-style v/s domed design. Metal is the only choice in our minds as the plastic style will melt and burn upon contact.

Many skylights are designed to open to bring in the fresh Sierra air.  If a wildfire comes unexpectedly, you might not have time to close them.  Stay ahead and prepare those windows with 1/16 inch non-combustible corrosion-resistant-metal mesh screening.

Window

Now that we have addressed skylights, let’s take a look at windows.  To reduce the vulnerability, look at these tips for the best options for fire-prone regions.

  • Chose multi-pane openings containing tempered glass
  • It does hurt to also invest in non-combustible shutters to provide extra protection.
  • Purchase windows that have screens as they serve as additional ‘guards’ for flying embers.

Fences

This is a pretty obvious one, yet we did not want to leave this section out of our tips to prevent a home from wildfire.  If your fence is made of combustible material, replace it completely.  Or at least replace the combustible section closest to the home with metal or non-combustible options.

And, as pretty as it is to have ivy or flowering vines growing on your fence, the experts at UNR Extension suggest that you opt not to do this.

We want to take this time to thank the University of Nevada, Reno Extension, College of Agriculture for proving this information to you.  For more insight about how to prepare and keep your home safe from fire, visit www.unr.edu/avrs.

 

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

Wildfire Home Preparedness Tips (Part One)

Fire safe houses

 

Every year our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe strives to share information about the (unfortunate) fire season in the High Sierra.  To get you ahead of the curve, we have obtained some excellent information from the University of Nevada, Reno, that provides tips on what you can do around your home to help protect it from fires.

The tips include specific information on how to retrofit existing parts of your home to withstand fires if they happen to enter your neighborhood.

As you read on, remember this fact:  In wildfire events, 60 – 90%of home loss is due to embers.

We encourage you to take the time to read our forthcoming News articles and share them with your neighbors as well.

The more you do to protect your home and its environment, the better the chances are of your home surviving a forest fire.

House Location

How and where your house is located makes a big difference as to how vulnerable your home may be.

Steep Slope or Forest Setting? When homes are located on steep slopes it is very common to have a few porches hanging over natural vegetation.  Experts suggest you remove as many of the bushes as possible between your porch and back or front yard.  The more space the better.

Forrest Setting?  Same concept as above.  We love our home in the mountains wrapped in the forest.  Yet as much as it is a beautiful setting, it’s probably the most vulnerable spot one can live.  Do your best to remove all low-hanging limbs and deciduous ‘duff’ in and around the tree wells.

Large Lot?  When one has a good-sized lot or plenty of acreage, it is not uncommon to have a garden shed, large wood pile, and other structures that are susceptible to fire.  Trim around these features and be sure that the wood pile is a good distance from the house.

Your Roof

There are three types of roofing.

Class A – Preferred: Made of asphalt fiberglass composition, shingles, clay and cementitious tiled, metal

Class B – Pressure impregnated fire-retardant treaded share or shingle

Class C – Recycled plastic, rubber, and aluminum

There are key things you can do to lower your home’s vulnerability to fire.

  • Replace it with Class A (unless that is on your home now)
  • Remove all debris – especially after the windy fall season (i.e. pine needles need to go!)
  • Clear your gutters
  • Install non-combustible and corrosion-resistant metal drip edging
  • Inspect open-eves areas for gaps where embers could land

And that is just the beginning.  Keep watching our News section for additional tips to keep your home as fire-safe as possible during the summer, and year-round.  The Sierra has been known to have an unexpected fire season in the winter months as well.

We want to take this time to thank the University of Nevada, Reno Extension, College of Agriculture for proving this information to you.  For more insight about how to prepare and keep your home safe from fire, visit www.unr.edu/avrs.

 

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

The Value of Skilled Trade Workers

Trade Skills

Trade Skills

Over the past two years, the Lake Tahoe and Truckee region have experienced tremendous growth.  Whether the increase in population has evolved over all the new resort developments or second homeowners choosing to make their vacation house a prominent home, the end result has impacted the construction business dramatically.

At our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe and Truckee, we are seeing lots of new trends; some are good, some not so good.

The good news is that there is more revenue streaming into our local business.  Our hardware stores, lumber yards and concrete operations are running full steam ahead to keep pace with the demand.  On the flip side, the lack of skilled trade workers is slowing down the pace, dramatically.

Thus the theme of our blog today ~ “The Value of Skilled Trade Worker”

Throughout the Reno/Lake Tahoe region, there are several colleges that offer an impressive list of classes and degrees for skilled trade. For those seeking a first-time career, or looking for a change of pace, maybe it’s time to register for some summer or fall classes now.

You can make a great living, and fulfill a huge need right here in the Tahoe basin and surrounding Reno and Carson City regions.  The list is as impressive as the money that one makes when he or she is educated and certified in any of the trade skills noted below.

  • Electricians
  • Plumbers and Pipefitters
  • Backhoe and other construction equipment operators
  • Electrical repairmen
  • Riggers
  • Machinists
  • Tool and die makers
  • Welders
  • Carpenters
  • Forklift handlers, including large capacity forklifts
  • Tile and marble setters
  • Cement masons and finishers
  • Painters
  • Sheet metal workers
  • Structural iron and steelworkers
  • Plasterers
  • Crane and tower operators
  • Dump truck operators

The closest campus (which offers virtual classes, too) is Western Nevada College.  Within their Class Schedule, you can find a wide variety of trade-oriented classes.  In addition, if you prefer to work on your own, their list of business and marketing courses can complement your skills and services as a freelance trade specialist.

If you have more of a creative mindset, be sure to check out their classes in Drafting, Architecture, and Design.  All of which are ideal if you would rather design a home than building one from the ground, up.

Our entire team at Borelli Architecture firm in Nevada encourages you to take a good look at the value of a trade skill.  You can take it anywhere and put some money away to build your own home, too!

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Below the Blue Keeps Tahoe Clean … for You!

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Throughout the great Lake Tahoe Basin, there are endless ways to enjoy the pristine waters that make our lake so famous.  But what about the Lake bottom?

Thanks to the efforts of “Below the Blue” the debris that flys off boats or are tossed into the lake does not exist like it used to.

This past week there was an excellent press release from the Tahoe Regional Planning agencies about “Below the Blue’s” efforts to clean up the lake, from its lakebed.  Here are some highlights that we thought you would enjoy reading today as posted on CarsonNow.com.

Monique Rydel-Fortner and Seth Jones have seen more of what lies underwater at Lake Tahoe than most. Unfortunately, that includes trash and lots of it — from drones, car batteries and sunken boats, to plate glass windows and enormous sheets of metal siding.

For more than a decade, the SCUBA divers and co-founders of the Tahoe-based nonprofit Below the Blue have removed more than 100,000 pounds of foreign objects from the Lake. Over countless dives, one source of submarine trash stands out as persistent but preventable — debris from shoreline building projects.

In cooperation with the League to Save Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the underwater environmentalists are working to stop the illicit practice of using Lake Tahoe as a construction site dumpster.

As noted by the co-founder of Below the Blue, Seth Jones said: “Out of sight is not out of mind.”

And our architect firm in Lake Tahoe completely agrees.

Sure, we have probably dropped our sunglasses off a pier yet to see the junk that they collect on an annual basis is just makes you think: “What were they thinking?”

Unloaded any unwanted items into the Lake is not only ‘not right,” it’s illegal.  Steve Sweet, who is the Compliance Code Program Manager at TRPA said it best:

“Discarding material of any kind in Lake Tahoe is illegal and violates the high standard of environmental stewardship in this community. Strengthening the requirements for shoreline construction permits will eliminate these careless and environmentally harmful practices to better protect Lake Tahoe.”

With Earth Day around the corner, we encourage you all to get involved in the variety of initiatives underway to keep Tahoe blue this year, and in years to come.   Click into South Tahoe Earth Day to learn more about where and when you can chip in to help in a small or significant way.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

What are BMP’s, and Why Are They Part of Tahoe’s Home Building Requirements?

Meeks Bay Architect BMPs Lake Tahoe

Meeks Bay Architect BMPs Lake Tahoe

For over 30 years, our architect firm has been designing lakefront and mountain homes that are situated with the Lake Tahoe Basin. And every year, our clients enquire about “BMP’s” which are defined as “Best Management Practices,” which are required as part of the home building (and selling) process.

With the building season around the corner, we thought it would be appropriate to dedicate this news article to this popular question.

BMP’s were created as part of the region’s quest to protect the Lake Tahoe Watershed that feeds into Lake Tahoe. As stated on the Tahoe Regional Planning Agencies’ (TRPA) website, here is the simple definition:

Best Management Practices, also known as BMPs, capture and infiltrate stormwater and stabilize soil to prevent erosion. This simulates pre-development conditions when precipitation would soak into the ground and be filtered by the soil, rather than running over impervious surfaces (like roofs and roads), collecting pollutants such as sediment and nutrients as it travels, and ultimately ending up in Lake Tahoe. Research proves that implementing BMPs on existing development is a critical step toward improving Lake Tahoe’s water quality and clarity.

The ideal end result is to ensure future generations continue to enjoy the pristine water within Lake Tahoe.

Whether our team at Borelli Architecture is designing homes, or commercial buildings, within the Tahoe basin, we will work with our partners to ensure the project includes the installation of BMP’s according to the TRPA requirements. Once the property has been reviewed and approved by a team member of the TRPA, the property owner will receive a BMP Certificate. At that point, it’s the owner’s responsibility to continue to maintain the land that surrounds their home or commercial establishment.

Examples of BMP’s for Your Home

There are some good resources available that have been written and published by the TRPA. Within this link, you will find an easy-to-read document that details some of the more common practices to prevent sediment and unwanted nutrients from entering our watershed.

It includes:

  • Paving dirt driveways
  • Installing drain rock under gutters and roof lines
  • Building retaining walls on steeper slopes
  • Vegetating and mulching open soil

For information, visit www.tahoebmp.org or call the BMP hotline at (775) 589-5202.

Or, feel free to contact our team. As part of our personal design services at Lake Tahoe, Borelli Architecture also offers the following assistance:

  • Custom Interior Design
  • Site Planning
  • Space Planning
  • Permit Processing Assistance
  • TRPA Feasibility Studies
  • Contractor Selection and Bidding Assistance
  • Construction Administration Services

Finally, if you are thinking about building a home within the Lake Tahoe basin, now is the time to get started. Connect with us now for your complimentary consultation.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

New TRPA Forestry Efforts Give Hope to Healthier Habitats to Come

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

With memories of a summer filled with smokey skies and raging fires, residents throughout Lake Tahoe are fully-focused on efforts to keep summers like last year in the past and never to return.

Recently, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPS) Governing Board approved new policies to expedite forest revitalization programs throughout the High Sierra.  In a recent press release, they announced their plans – with the most aggressive change focusing on the change in policies about ‘ground-based’ mechanical equipment (bulldozers, etc.).  As the story noted:

The decision expands the areas where ground-based mechanical equipment can be used on steep slopes. The new policy will promote forest and ecosystem resilience to disturbances such as climate change, the agency said today.

Steep terrain can be more difficult and resource-intensive for land managers to reduce hazardous forest fuels. Prior to the update, Lake Tahoe agencies could use ground-based mechanical equipment on slopes up to a 30 percent gradient, while work on steeper slopes was limited to hand crews, pile burning, and aerial logging to protect water quality from potential erosion.

TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said, “The Caldor Fire and the surge of megafires in the region are clear directives for us to improve our forest health policies to better protect communities and the environment from wildfire. TRPA is committed to advancing science-based practices that protect the lake and bolster our resilience to ever-growing wildfire threats, especially given the need for fuels reduction work in untreated areas narrowly missed by the Caldor Fire.”

In previous years, in fact in decards, machinery was not allowed on ANY slope over 30%.  This long-standing directive dates back to our own experience here in Incline Village when the former Ski Incline transformed its resort and doubled its terrain back in 1987.  During that year, the expansion (now known as Diamond Peak) was literally built by hand.  And for those of you who have skied the upper mountain, you can only imagine how the crews had to dig the holes for the lift towers, remove vegetation, and build structures at the top of the Peak.

The story adds another visual to the challenge at hand:

The policy change will facilitate additional forest health projects on steeper slopes. Approximately 61,000 acres in the Tahoe Basin have slopes from 30 to 50 percent, and nearly half of that area is in wildland-urban interface defense and threat zones near communities where hand crews continue to work. Additionally, post-fire assessments of the Caldor Fire show that steeper slopes tended to burn at higher severity than other areas.

“This is a game-changer for fuels reduction in the basin,” Chief Scott Lindgren of Tahoe Douglas Fire Protection District said. “Hilly terrain is a significant portion of the Tahoe Basin and with the right kind of equipment, we can do quality fuel reduction work and protect the environment at the same time.”

Our team at Borelli Architecture applauds the TRPA and all who are focused on a healthier, safer, future for the entire region.  If you are interested in learning more about their year-round efforts to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

If you would like a personal insight about the TRPA, securing building permits in Tahoe, and other key initiatives that are key to starting to build a home in the Tahoe basin Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

New Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe Now Open

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

(Photo courtesy of Clear Creek Tahoe and Chase International – Listing Real Estate Office)

On behalf of Borelli Architecture firm at Lake Tahoe and Carson City, Nevada, we are sending out our congratulations to our friends at Clear Creek Tahoe in Carson City.  This past month they announced the Grand Opening of their new 20,000 SF Clubhouse.

In a recent article in the Tahoe Daily Tribune, General Manager Milward Bell-Bhatti quoted:

“Now more than ever, our community seeks connection, and we couldn’t be more excited to introduce the Clear Creek Clubhouse to meet this need. We focused on the pillars that set our community apart, from culinary to wellness and golf, with spaces appropriately both grand and intimate to celebrate life in the mountains and provides a legacy environment for our members active Tahoe lifestyle.”

If you have ever wanted to live a life that included year-round recreation steps from your porch, this prestigious development on the eastern edge of the High Sierra offers its own golf course and private beach house on the edge of Lake Tahoe.  In addition, the new Clubhouse offers the following features and amenities:

Highlights of the new Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe include:

  • A stone hearth and fireplace —the ideal spot to warm up
  • Outdoor dining areas, complete with a fire pit and stunning views
  • Terraces for lounging that overlook our beautiful golf course with dramatic rock outcroppings in the background
  • A welcoming dining room complete with fireplace and vaulted windows that overlooks the 18th green and the Event Lawn
  • A pub and lounge just off the dining room for light snacks, cocktails, and that all-important recap of the day’s golf game
  • Fitness room with the latest cardio equipment and weights, a movement studio, a spin studio, and a refreshment station
  • Locker rooms thoughtfully designed around gathering and socializing, with generous wet areas and steam rooms
  • Single and couples’ treatment rooms for massage and other body work

At this time, Borelli Architecture is designing several homes within the resort and is in contract with a few other residents who have chosen to live a full and active life at Clear Creek.

Lots are still available for sale – yet there are not many left to purchase.

If you would like a personal tour of what is, without question, THE place to work or retire, I would be happy to show you the options at any time. Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in the Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Winter Driving Safety Tips

Winter Driving Tips

With all the recent snowfall, we continue to encourage our friends and family to be cautious as they come and go to enjoy the grandeur of Lake Tahoe. Whether you have lived in the Tahoe Basin for a long time or are new to the High Sierra, it’s always a good thing to refresh yourself about how to drive through safely in and around our mountainous roads.

For a fresh look at the best advice, we dove into the Nevada Department of Transportation’s website. We found this informative list in their numerous stories about traffic safety, road conditions and webcams for roads in Nevada, and construction updates.

Before you head out to the slopes or trails, or just head to the local stores to stock up on supplies, we encourage you to review this list from NDOT’s news section:

Winter Driving Safety Tips (courtesy of the Nevada Department of Transportation)

 Winter driving safety tips are available at dot.nv.gov/winter.

  • Only travel in winter weather when necessary, leave enough time to safely reach your destination and plan your route to help avoid snowy/icy areas and steep hills.
  • Before driving, check weather and road conditions by dialing 511 within Nevada (or 1-877-NV-ROADS outside of Nevada) or logging on to www.nvroads.com.
  • Share your travel itinerary so others know when to expect you.
  • Remove snow and ice from all vehicle windows, mirrors, lights, turn signals and license plates.
  • Buckle up.
  • Turn on headlights to see and be seen.
  • Do not rely solely on GPS to find alternate routes, as it could lead to unmaintained roadways or hazardous areas.
  • Turn off cruise control.
  • Avoid quick starts, stops and fast turns. Accelerate, brake and steer smoothly and gradually.
  • Reduce speed. Speed limits are based on normal road and weather conditions, not winter road conditions.
  • Do not slam on the brakes. Apply steady pressure on ABS-equipped (antilock braking system) vehicles and pump the brakes if necessary on non-ABS vehicles.
  • Always comply with all posted traction device requirements.
  • If your vehicle has snow tires, install and use them between October 1 and April 30.
  • Keep extra distance from other vehicles.
  • Watch carefully for snow removal equipment.
  • Do not pass without reasonable distance and sight clearance.
  • Use extra caution on bridges, ramps, overpasses and shaded areas- they may freeze first.
  • Maintain a high fuel level.
  • If the vehicle begins to skid, steer in the direction of the slide and slowly remove the foot from the accelerator.
  • Be aware of black ice.
  • If parked or stuck in the snow, leave a window slightly cracked for ventilation and ensure the vehicle exhaust system is clear of snow.
    Check before you go:
    Tires    Brakes    Lights    Battery     Wipers    Defroster   Heater   Vehicle Fluid Levels
    Carry with you:
    Tire chains     Flashlight    Ice scraper    Snow shovel     First-aid supplies
    Extra clothes/gloves   Blanket     Flares    Non-perishable food/water

In the meantime, if you want more details about what it is like to live in the mountains or have thought about building a home in Truckee or Lake Tahoe, feel free to reach out at any time. Our family at Borelli Architecture has been living and working in the Sierra for over 30 years.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060