Wildfire Home Preparedness Tips (Part One)

Fire safe houses

 

Every year our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe strives to share information about the (unfortunate) fire season in the High Sierra.  To get you ahead of the curve, we have obtained some excellent information from the University of Nevada, Reno, that provides tips on what you can do around your home to help protect it from fires.

The tips include specific information on how to retrofit existing parts of your home to withstand fires if they happen to enter your neighborhood.

As you read on, remember this fact:  In wildfire events, 60 – 90%of home loss is due to embers.

We encourage you to take the time to read our forthcoming News articles and share them with your neighbors as well.

The more you do to protect your home and its environment, the better the chances are of your home surviving a forest fire.

House Location

How and where your house is located makes a big difference as to how vulnerable your home may be.

Steep Slope or Forest Setting? When homes are located on steep slopes it is very common to have a few porches hanging over natural vegetation.  Experts suggest you remove as many of the bushes as possible between your porch and back or front yard.  The more space the better.

Forrest Setting?  Same concept as above.  We love our home in the mountains wrapped in the forest.  Yet as much as it is a beautiful setting, it’s probably the most vulnerable spot one can live.  Do your best to remove all low-hanging limbs and deciduous ‘duff’ in and around the tree wells.

Large Lot?  When one has a good-sized lot or plenty of acreage, it is not uncommon to have a garden shed, large wood pile, and other structures that are susceptible to fire.  Trim around these features and be sure that the wood pile is a good distance from the house.

Your Roof

There are three types of roofing.

Class A – Preferred: Made of asphalt fiberglass composition, shingles, clay and cementitious tiled, metal

Class B – Pressure impregnated fire-retardant treaded share or shingle

Class C – Recycled plastic, rubber, and aluminum

There are key things you can do to lower your home’s vulnerability to fire.

  • Replace it with Class A (unless that is on your home now)
  • Remove all debris – especially after the windy fall season (i.e. pine needles need to go!)
  • Clear your gutters
  • Install non-combustible and corrosion-resistant metal drip edging
  • Inspect open-eves areas for gaps where embers could land

And that is just the beginning.  Keep watching our News section for additional tips to keep your home as fire-safe as possible during the summer, and year-round.  The Sierra has been known to have an unexpected fire season in the winter months as well.

We want to take this time to thank the University of Nevada, Reno Extension, College of Agriculture for proving this information to you.  For more insight about how to prepare and keep your home safe from fire, visit www.unr.edu/avrs.

 

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How to Make A Family Emergency Preparedness Plan

Emergency Preparedness Resources

 

Emergency Preparedness Resources

Over the past few years, the Lake Tahoe region has experienced some of the most devastating forest fires.  With summer around the corner, our team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village researched ideas on what you can do in advance to prepare you, your home, and your family ahead of time.

Thanks to the North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District, there is a wealth of information online.  Throughout our next few News articles, we are going to share some of their most valuable resources.

This first Edition comes from their Emergency Preparedness Brochure, General Emergency Preparedness section.

GET INFORMED & MAKE A FAMILY PLAN

In our area, we have the potential for disasters caused by earthquakes, wildland fires, and weather-related emergencies. Take time to plan for the problems related to each type of disaster.

If you have pets, make a pet plan. Animals may not be allowed inside emergency shelters due to health regulations.

Find out how to help elderly or disabled persons in your home or neighborhood.

Ask about disaster plans at your workplace, your children’s school or daycare center, and other places where your family spends time.

MAKE A FAMILY EMERGENCY PLAN

Meet with household members — Explain the dangers to children and your emergency plans. Work with them as a team to prepare your family to deal with emergencies.

Discuss what to do about power outages and personal injuries.

Post emergency telephone numbers near telephones.

Learn how to turn off the water, gas and electricity at your home.

Decide where to meet — In the event of an emergency, you may become
separated from family members. Choose a place right outside your home in case
of a sudden emergency, like a fire. Choose a location outside your neighborhood
in case you cannot return home.

Choose an “Out-of-Town” contact — Ask an out-of-town friend or relative to be
your contact in the event of a disaster. Everyone must know the contact’s phone
number. It is often easier to make a long-distance phone call than a local call from
a disaster area. Teach children how to make long-distance telephone calls.

Complete a family communications plan – Your plan should include contact
information for family members, work, and school.

In a fire or other emergency, you may need to evacuate very quickly. Be ready to get out fast. Be sure everyone in your family
knows the best escape routes out of your home as well as where the safe places are in your home for each type of disaster. Draw a Home Family Escape Plan with your family outlining two escape routes from each room.

Schools will soon be closing for the summer, which makes now an ideal time to set aside time to make your own family emergency plans. We encourage you to do so, soon, and wish you a safe and memorable summer to come.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

Below the Blue Keeps Tahoe Clean … for You!

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Throughout the great Lake Tahoe Basin, there are endless ways to enjoy the pristine waters that make our lake so famous.  But what about the Lake bottom?

Thanks to the efforts of “Below the Blue” the debris that flys off boats or are tossed into the lake does not exist like it used to.

This past week there was an excellent press release from the Tahoe Regional Planning agencies about “Below the Blue’s” efforts to clean up the lake, from its lakebed.  Here are some highlights that we thought you would enjoy reading today as posted on CarsonNow.com.

Monique Rydel-Fortner and Seth Jones have seen more of what lies underwater at Lake Tahoe than most. Unfortunately, that includes trash and lots of it — from drones, car batteries and sunken boats, to plate glass windows and enormous sheets of metal siding.

For more than a decade, the SCUBA divers and co-founders of the Tahoe-based nonprofit Below the Blue have removed more than 100,000 pounds of foreign objects from the Lake. Over countless dives, one source of submarine trash stands out as persistent but preventable — debris from shoreline building projects.

In cooperation with the League to Save Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the underwater environmentalists are working to stop the illicit practice of using Lake Tahoe as a construction site dumpster.

As noted by the co-founder of Below the Blue, Seth Jones said: “Out of sight is not out of mind.”

And our architect firm in Lake Tahoe completely agrees.

Sure, we have probably dropped our sunglasses off a pier yet to see the junk that they collect on an annual basis is just makes you think: “What were they thinking?”

Unloaded any unwanted items into the Lake is not only ‘not right,” it’s illegal.  Steve Sweet, who is the Compliance Code Program Manager at TRPA said it best:

“Discarding material of any kind in Lake Tahoe is illegal and violates the high standard of environmental stewardship in this community. Strengthening the requirements for shoreline construction permits will eliminate these careless and environmentally harmful practices to better protect Lake Tahoe.”

With Earth Day around the corner, we encourage you all to get involved in the variety of initiatives underway to keep Tahoe blue this year, and in years to come.   Click into South Tahoe Earth Day to learn more about where and when you can chip in to help in a small or significant way.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

New TRPA Forestry Efforts Give Hope to Healthier Habitats to Come

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

With memories of a summer filled with smokey skies and raging fires, residents throughout Lake Tahoe are fully-focused on efforts to keep summers like last year in the past and never to return.

Recently, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPS) Governing Board approved new policies to expedite forest revitalization programs throughout the High Sierra.  In a recent press release, they announced their plans – with the most aggressive change focusing on the change in policies about ‘ground-based’ mechanical equipment (bulldozers, etc.).  As the story noted:

The decision expands the areas where ground-based mechanical equipment can be used on steep slopes. The new policy will promote forest and ecosystem resilience to disturbances such as climate change, the agency said today.

Steep terrain can be more difficult and resource-intensive for land managers to reduce hazardous forest fuels. Prior to the update, Lake Tahoe agencies could use ground-based mechanical equipment on slopes up to a 30 percent gradient, while work on steeper slopes was limited to hand crews, pile burning, and aerial logging to protect water quality from potential erosion.

TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said, “The Caldor Fire and the surge of megafires in the region are clear directives for us to improve our forest health policies to better protect communities and the environment from wildfire. TRPA is committed to advancing science-based practices that protect the lake and bolster our resilience to ever-growing wildfire threats, especially given the need for fuels reduction work in untreated areas narrowly missed by the Caldor Fire.”

In previous years, in fact in decards, machinery was not allowed on ANY slope over 30%.  This long-standing directive dates back to our own experience here in Incline Village when the former Ski Incline transformed its resort and doubled its terrain back in 1987.  During that year, the expansion (now known as Diamond Peak) was literally built by hand.  And for those of you who have skied the upper mountain, you can only imagine how the crews had to dig the holes for the lift towers, remove vegetation, and build structures at the top of the Peak.

The story adds another visual to the challenge at hand:

The policy change will facilitate additional forest health projects on steeper slopes. Approximately 61,000 acres in the Tahoe Basin have slopes from 30 to 50 percent, and nearly half of that area is in wildland-urban interface defense and threat zones near communities where hand crews continue to work. Additionally, post-fire assessments of the Caldor Fire show that steeper slopes tended to burn at higher severity than other areas.

“This is a game-changer for fuels reduction in the basin,” Chief Scott Lindgren of Tahoe Douglas Fire Protection District said. “Hilly terrain is a significant portion of the Tahoe Basin and with the right kind of equipment, we can do quality fuel reduction work and protect the environment at the same time.”

Our team at Borelli Architecture applauds the TRPA and all who are focused on a healthier, safer, future for the entire region.  If you are interested in learning more about their year-round efforts to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

If you would like a personal insight about the TRPA, securing building permits in Tahoe, and other key initiatives that are key to starting to build a home in the Tahoe basin Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

How To Shovel Snow From Your Roof?

How to shovel snow from a roof?

With record snowfall breaking all the records for December in Lake Tahoe, our architect firm in Truckee and Lake Tahoe is getting calls about snow removal … from the roof.  Although we certainly know all about designing mountain homes that meet the structural requirements for significant snowfall like we are experienceing today, when it come to the question about how to remove snow from the rooftops, we refer our clients to professionals who know how to safely get the job done.

To help you start your own research on the subject, we found an excellent article posted on State Farm Insurance’s website.

Here are the highlights of the story posed by the question “How do you know if you have too much snow on the roof?”

One cubic foot of fluffy, dry snow weighs about three pounds. The same amount of dense, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. While most roofs are built to withstand more than that, your roof may be under too much pressure if you see these signs:

  • Visible sagging along the roofline
  • Cracks in the ceiling or on the walls
  • Popping or creaking noises
  • Difficult-to-open doors and windows

As it melts excess snow can also lead to ice dams — melting snow refreezes and can damage your home’s interior under the eave line.

How to safely clear your roof

Keep the following in mind:

  • Hire a professional. A person who does this work regularly should know the best techniques and likely be insured.
  • Never work alone. Always have someone with you in case you slip or have an emergency.
  • Clear the area. The ladder up to your roof should be positioned on solid ground. Also, make sure the rungs are clear of ice and snow before you climb.
  • Secure yourself. If possible, use a strap or belt to anchor yourself to something strong, like a chimney.
  • Avoid shingle damage. Stay away from picks, hammers, or other sharp tools to clear snow and ice.
  • Use the right tools. If you have a one-story or flat-roofed house, invest in a snow rake. These long-handled tools with plastic blades can help you gently pull snow from the edge of the roof line.

Inasmuch as this is a good recap of how to get the job done, our team at Borelli Architecture suggests you seek professionals to get the job done.  Roofing companies and possibly professional tree removal companies would be a good place to start.  Here’s a link to the Better Business Bureau’s recommendations. 

In the meantime, if you want more details about how to build a structurally sound home in the mountains, feel free to reach out at any time.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Home Winter Preparation Tips

Winter Driving Safety Tips for Lake Tahoe Homeowners

Winter Home Safety Tips for Lake Tahoe Homeowners

With three new feet of snow, and counting, at Lake Tahoe, now is the time to prep your home for the wet and white winter to come (unless you have done your chores before now)!  There’s lots of good information below that was published within the  Tahoe Daily Tribune and written by North Lake Tahoe Fire Prevention District’s Chief Ryan Sommers.

At our architect firm at Lake Tahoe, and based in Incline Village above 6,500′ we know all about preparing for what’s to come this winter.  That said, no matter where you live, these tips are good no matter where you live.  If you are here in the High Sierra, we encourage you to take the time to review the details now … in between shoveling this week? Next week? … We’ll see what comes our way!

The following content is courtesy of Ryan Sommers – as posted in the Tahoe Daily Tribune

Winter Home Safety Tips …

•Test and replace batteries. Check or replace carbon monoxide batteries twice a year: when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. Replace smoke alarm alkaline batteries at least once a year. Test alarms every month to ensure they work properly.

•Be prepared for cold weather. Prepare your home, car and have a winter weather checklist that includes emergency preparedness information for communication, making a plan and supplies kit. Register for CODE RED emergency alert notifications.

•Keep stairs and walking areas free of electrical cords, shoes, clothing, books, magazines, and other items

•Improve the lighting in and outside your home. Use nightlights or a flashlight to light the path between your bedroom and the bathroom. Turn on the lights before using the stairs. See an eye specialist once a year – better vision can help prevent falls.

•Use non-slip mats in the bathtub and on shower floors. Have grab bars installed on the wall next to the bathtub, shower, and toilet if needed. Wipe up spilled liquids immediately.

•Stairways should be well lit from both the top and the bottom. Have easy-to-grip handrails installed along the full length of both sides of the stairs.

•Be aware of uneven surfaces indoors and outdoors. If you must have scatter rugs, make sure they lay flat and do not slide when you step on them. Smooth out wrinkles and folds in carpeting. Be aware of uneven sidewalks and pavement outdoors. Ask a family member or friend to clear ice and snow from outside stairs and walkways and always use handrails if available. Step carefully.

•Wear sturdy, well-fitting low-heeled shoes with non-slip soles. They are safer than slippers, stocking feet, high heels, or thick soled athletic shoes

•Have heating equipment, chimney and stove inspected and cleaned by a certified HVAC technician and/or chimney sweep every fall just before heating season.

•Test your Smoke and CO alarms and replace batteries if needed. Refer to manufacturer’s instructions

•Allow ashes to COOL before disposing of them. Four days or 96 hours is the minimum recommended cooling period for ashes.

•Place completely cooled ashes in a covered metal container. Keep the container at least ten feet away from the home and other buildings. They should never be disposed of in a plastic garbage box or can, a cardboard box, or paper grocery bag. Never use a vacuum cleaner to pick up ashes. The metal container should be placed away from anything flammable. It should not be placed next to a firewood pile, up against or in the garage, on or under a wood deck, or under a porch. After sitting for a week in the metal container, check them again to be sure that they are cool. If so, the ashes are then safe to dispose of in your trash. Ask your local Fire District if they have an Ash Can Program.

•As a safety precaution keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from a fireplace, wood stove, or any other heating appliance, and create a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires. It is important to make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying, and never leave a fire unattended, particularly when children are present.

We hope this safety information helps you and your family to prepare and plan for whatever comes our way.  And, if you ever need advice on key features to include in the design of your mountain home, do reach out.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How To Get A Permit to Build A Boat Dock or Buoy Mooring in Lake Tahoe

This past year it seems like the world moved to Lake Tahoe to enjoy the lifestyle that comes with living and working throughout the High Sierra.  Within this ‘dream-like lifestyle,’ comes visions of working in the morning and heading out on the Lake for an afternoon of wake surfing or waterskiing.

As one who has lived here for over 30 years, and designed lakefront homes at Lake Tahoe, this lifestyle is real and very doable.

However, slipping out onto the crystal clear waters from your own boat dock doesn’t come easy for those who have purchased a Lakefront home and want to add a pier and/or buoy mooring just outside of one’s home office.  Living within the Lake Tahoe Watershed comes with from pretty stringent rules – all for good reasons – to keep the Lake as pristine as it is today.

To secure a permit to build a boat dock or get a mooring is like winning the lottery, yet can be done.

Within the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s website is a section that will help you to better understand the steps one must take to POSSIBLY secure a permit to build your dream dock.  Here are some highlights from their website.

All moorings including buoys, boat lifts, and boat slips are subject to annual registration fees paid through this system. New moorings require a TRPA permit and existing moorings must be registered and/or permitted through the Phase 1 process below.

Allocation of New Moorings

As part of the Shoreline Plan, TRPA may permit up to a maximum of 2,116 additional (new) moorings. Allowable moorings include buoys, boat lifts, and boat slips and are distributed through the following pools:

  • 1,486 private moorings (buoys or boat lifts)
  • 330 marina moorings (buoys or boat slips)
  • 300 public agency moorings (buoys or boat slips)

New mooring allocations will be released in accordance with TRPA Code of Ordinances 84.3.2.E.4: a maximum of fifteen (15) percent of the available moorings from each of the three pools can be allocated annually.

Eligibility Criteria

Private moorings

Single-family parcels:

  • Up to two moorings per parcel; existing moorings count towards maximum moorings allowed
  • Littoral – single-family parcel must adjoin or abut the high water elevation of Lake Tahoe
  • Best Management Practices (BMPs) Certificate – The littoral parcel must have a BMP Certificate of Completion prior to entering the mooring lottery. You can check the BMP compliance status on the TRPA Parcel Tracker. For more information on BMPs or to request assistance from TRPA’s Stormwater Management Program, please visit tahoebmp.org or call the BMP hotline at (775) 589-5202.

In addition, private moorings must comply with all eligibility, capacity, mitigation, development and location standards of TRPA Code of Ordinances Chapters 80-85, which include, but are not limited to:

  • Located outside a Stream-mouth Protection Zone
  • Boat lifts: one per parcel on an existing pier, up to four
  • Mooring buoys:
    • At least 50 feet from another mooring buoy (50-foot grid spacing for buoy fields)
    • At least 20 feet from adjacent littoral parcel projection line boundaries
    • Buoys not in buoy fields: No greater than 600 feet lakeward from elevation 6,220 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, as measured horizontally, or no farther lakeward than elevation 6,210 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, whichever is less
    • Buoy fields: No greater than 600 feet lakeward from elevation 6,220 feet Lake Tahoe Datum, as measured horizontally, and does not exceed the maximum buoy field size (derived from littoral HOA parcel dimensions)
On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we are here to help you build the home of your dreams, be it on the lake, golf course, or high atop the High Sierra.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Why the TRPA Parcel Tracker is Important to You

Mountain Home Design in Incline Village

Mountain Home Design in Incline Village

As an architectural firm that offers services above normal expectations, Borelli Architecture in Incline Village, NV, uses its collective talents and local knowledge to professionally complete each project.  Why is this important to you?

When one begins to build a home in our environmentally sensitive area, there are rules and regulations that are uniquely uncommon throughout the Tahoe Basin and its protected Watershed.  That said, long before we start to design homes for our clients, we review the property first.

Using the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency’s “Parcel Tracker,” we can learn all about the lot’s location and what environmental projects may affect or enhance the property’s design.  This list includes deed restrictions, land capability information, development rights associated with the parcel, and a summary of TRPA permit records.

After securing these important details, we meet with our clients to review the findings and proceed on not just the design of the home, yet these important services as well:

  • Site Planning
  • Space Planning
  • Permit Processing Assistance
  • TRPA Feasibility Studies
  • Contractor Selection and Bidding Assistance
  • Construction Administration Service

If you are thinking about buying property in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, or the Truckee Region, we will be here to help you assess your property and provide local insight into your local county and environmental regulations.

On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we look forward to sharing that insight with you.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Lake Tahoe, Truckee Welcoming Tourists To Return This Fall

Things to do in the Fall in Lake Tahoe and Truckee

As the fall season kicks into full gear, the North Lake Tahoe and Truckee communities are welcoming the return of “tourist season” that was put on hold as our courageous firefighters and support teams focused on saving the Lake and surrounding Sierra.

Within the message to all to come to enjoy our colorful season comes an equal message to come back safely.

Below you will find important information brought you via this blog from our architect firm in Truckee and Lake Tahoe that is posted on the VisitTruckeeTahoe.com website.  We encourage all our clients and friends to take a few moments to read this important information.  Within the context are some new programs that we think you may want to be a part of as you return to the High Sierra to enjoy our colorful season and support our local businesses who will welcome you with open arms!

2021 Sustainable Truckee Programs & Partners

(1) Daily Truckee Travel Alert

We coordinate with several partners and land management agencies to ensure you get key alerts, safety messages, and information about wildfire preparedness, weather, business status, trails, events and more for Truckee, California. This page is maintained daily with need to know information for visitors and residents. Know before you go.

VIEW TRUCKEE TRAVEL ALERT

(2) Sustainable Truckee – Trail Host Ambassador Program

Ambassadors are stationed and patrolling key Truckee trailheads to educate and inform trail users on how to Recreate Responsibly. In addition, ambassadors keep a sharp eye out for illegal campfires. Managing partner Truckee Trails Foundation. Funding partner Truckee Fire Protection District.

(3) Sustainable Truckee – Trailhead Signage Program

Signs created in partnership with USFS, Truckee Fire Protection District, and the Truckee Trails Foundation are posted at 18 trailheads with the objectives of mitigating wildfire danger, trash and cultivating a friendly/positive outdoor experience. Funding partner Truckee Fire Protection District.

(4) Sustainable Truckee – Outdoor Recreation Collaborative (STORC)

A collaborative that brings key Truckee stakeholders together to provide support and resources, establish unified messaging, and solve issues around high-use, peak period outdoor recreation. Funding partners: Visit Truckee-Tahoe, Nevada County, Town of Truckee, Truckee Donner Land Trust, Truckee Tahoe Airport District.

(5) Sustainable Truckee – Historic Downtown Flagpole Banners

Along the main street, you will see multiple outdoor nature and wildlife images on lampposts with the message “Take Care”. Sixty-one poles promote a protect, preserve and take care of our natural environment message.

(6) Local Voices Making Climate Choices

Sustainable Truckee features Truckee-Tahoe locals and highlights how our community lives sustainably.  Everyone, including visitors, are welcome to join!

MEET LOCALS & JOIN US!

(7) Focused Visitor Messaging “Recreate Responsibly”

We’re joining a local, regional, and national effort to amplify the Recreate Responsibly guidelines and encourage responsible travel.

HOW TO RECREATE RESPONSIBLY

(8) Truckee-Tahoe Traveler Responsibility Pledge

A regional pledge that encourages visitors to become responsible travelers through six action items: Become a Steward of Truckee-Tahoe, Respect the Environment, Stay Educated, Keep Wildlife Wild, Be Fire Safe, Demonstrate Mindful Travel.

TAKE THE PLEDGE

(9) Voluntourism Opportunities

A list of easy ways to get involved and volunteer with local, Truckee-Tahoe nonprofits. Meet locals and spend a few hours doing something completely unique and memorable on your vacation. On your own, and “drop in” opportunities available.

VIEW VOLUNTOURISM LIST

(10) Truckee Outdoor Recreation Summer Map

Comprehensive trail map detailing safety, trail etiquette, and orientation to popular and off the beaten path trails in and nearby Truckee. In development.

On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we look forward to sharing all there is to do and see in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee, CA this fall.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How to Help Families Who Lost Their Home During the Caldor Fire

Caldor Fire in Lake Tahoe

Caldor Fire in Lake Tahoe

As of this morning, things are looking much brighter for those whose homes were in the path of the Caldor Fire.  For those who won’t return as their homes are beyond repair or no longer exist, we are reaching out to all our clients and connections to share this important post from our friends at TahoeFund.org.

Please take the time to review this announcement and if you want to contribute, just follow the links for complete details.

Caldor Relief – How You Can Help

As we are all watching the Caldor Fire situation, many people are asking how they can help. Although firefighters and first responders greatly appreciate the generosity and kindness of donations, firefighting agencies are fully supplied with everything they need. Donations from the public are logistically complicated to accept and firefighting agencies do not have the capacity to do so.
Locally, Tahoe Family Solutions and Cornerstone Church are accepting goods to support family needs. Stop by the TFS Thrift Shop on Southwood Boulevard for the most current list of things they are distributing to families throughout Lake Tahoe.
If you would like to offer assistance to those affected by the Caldor Fire, donations are best directed towards evacuees. Here are funds that are helping victims of the Caldor Fire:
El Dorado Community Foundation – The El Dorado County Community Foundation set up a Caldor Fire Fund. All donations go to families and individuals impacted by the fire. You can donate here. (https://edcf.fcsuite.com/erp/donate/create?funit_id=1792)
The American Red Cross – The American Red Cross is staffing evacuation centers and providing support for evacuees of the Caldor Fire. You can donate here (https://www.redcross.org/donate/cm/abc10-pub.html/).
Placer Food Bank – The Placer Food Bank is on the front lines of emergency food response/distribution to those impacted by the River and Caldor Fires. You can donate here. (https://donate.placerfoodbank.org/for/pfb?_ga=2.168769441.1692671111.1585586084-667740226.1583304010)
Food Bank of Northern Nevada – The Food Bank of Northern Nevada is offering food assistance for Caldor Fire evacuees. You can donate here. (https://give.fbnn.org/for/zcjkyj/)
Monitor Incident Information – Stay up to date on the current acreage, containment statistics, evacuation information, and more by visiting the incident link tree (https://linktr.ee/IMT6). For the latest Caldor Incident information, attend a live CAL FIRE AEU community meeting daily at 5 PM at www.facebook.com/CALFIREAEU.
On behalf of our team at our architect firm serving Lake Tahoe, Truckee, and Carson City, NV, we encourage you to support our community and families who need it most.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060