Earth Day and Earth Week Activities at Lake Tahoe

As this month comes to a close we are encouraging our friends and family to get outside and get involved in the numerous Earth Day events throughout the Lake.

One of the region’s most focused and forthright agencies has taken the lead in creating activities and events for all ages.  The group is called Take Care Tahoe and they have an impressive list of things to do and see this week.  For more details, other than this list from their website, click into their site for ways to keep Tahoe Blue this week, and all year-round.

Mother Nature Monday …

  • Download the Tahoe Nature Activity Book for a month’s worth of nature activities
  • Join the dark sky movement and turn off outside lights at night to protect wildlife and save energy
  • Download the Citizen Science Tahoe app, to share your observations of Lake Tahoe with scientists to help researchers better understand conditions around the lake

What to Wear: Animal print or animal-themed shirt

Climate Action Tuesday

What to Wear: White for clean clouds

Clean Water Wednesday

  • Fill your reusable water bottle with Tahoe Tap and help eliminate microplastics from polluting our waterways
  • Pick up dog poop on your neighborhood walk to help protect water clarity
  • Take the Tahoe Keeper Quiz to learn how to clean, drain and dry your boat and gear to keep Aquatic Invasive Species out of Lake Tahoe
  • Complete Keep Tahoe Blue’s Preserve a Plant activity

What to Wear: Blue for clean water

Trash Free Thursday

What to Wear: Green for the Earth!

Healthy Forest Friday

What to Wear: Red to prevent wildfire

Sustainable Saturday

What to Wear: Colors of the rainbow

At Borelli Architecture in Incline Village and Lake Tahoe, we will be out and about supporting their efforts. And we encourage you to do the same.

 

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Below the Blue Keeps Tahoe Clean … for You!

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Lake Tahoe North Shore

Throughout the great Lake Tahoe Basin, there are endless ways to enjoy the pristine waters that make our lake so famous.  But what about the Lake bottom?

Thanks to the efforts of “Below the Blue” the debris that flys off boats or are tossed into the lake does not exist like it used to.

This past week there was an excellent press release from the Tahoe Regional Planning agencies about “Below the Blue’s” efforts to clean up the lake, from its lakebed.  Here are some highlights that we thought you would enjoy reading today as posted on CarsonNow.com.

Monique Rydel-Fortner and Seth Jones have seen more of what lies underwater at Lake Tahoe than most. Unfortunately, that includes trash and lots of it — from drones, car batteries and sunken boats, to plate glass windows and enormous sheets of metal siding.

For more than a decade, the SCUBA divers and co-founders of the Tahoe-based nonprofit Below the Blue have removed more than 100,000 pounds of foreign objects from the Lake. Over countless dives, one source of submarine trash stands out as persistent but preventable — debris from shoreline building projects.

In cooperation with the League to Save Lake Tahoe and the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, the underwater environmentalists are working to stop the illicit practice of using Lake Tahoe as a construction site dumpster.

As noted by the co-founder of Below the Blue, Seth Jones said: “Out of sight is not out of mind.”

And our architect firm in Lake Tahoe completely agrees.

Sure, we have probably dropped our sunglasses off a pier yet to see the junk that they collect on an annual basis is just makes you think: “What were they thinking?”

Unloaded any unwanted items into the Lake is not only ‘not right,” it’s illegal.  Steve Sweet, who is the Compliance Code Program Manager at TRPA said it best:

“Discarding material of any kind in Lake Tahoe is illegal and violates the high standard of environmental stewardship in this community. Strengthening the requirements for shoreline construction permits will eliminate these careless and environmentally harmful practices to better protect Lake Tahoe.”

With Earth Day around the corner, we encourage you all to get involved in the variety of initiatives underway to keep Tahoe blue this year, and in years to come.   Click into South Tahoe Earth Day to learn more about where and when you can chip in to help in a small or significant way.

Jim Borelli - Borelli Architecture Lake Tahoe Carson City Truckee

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

New TRPA Forestry Efforts Give Hope to Healthier Habitats to Come

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

Hiking in Lake Tahoe

With memories of a summer filled with smokey skies and raging fires, residents throughout Lake Tahoe are fully-focused on efforts to keep summers like last year in the past and never to return.

Recently, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency (TRPS) Governing Board approved new policies to expedite forest revitalization programs throughout the High Sierra.  In a recent press release, they announced their plans – with the most aggressive change focusing on the change in policies about ‘ground-based’ mechanical equipment (bulldozers, etc.).  As the story noted:

The decision expands the areas where ground-based mechanical equipment can be used on steep slopes. The new policy will promote forest and ecosystem resilience to disturbances such as climate change, the agency said today.

Steep terrain can be more difficult and resource-intensive for land managers to reduce hazardous forest fuels. Prior to the update, Lake Tahoe agencies could use ground-based mechanical equipment on slopes up to a 30 percent gradient, while work on steeper slopes was limited to hand crews, pile burning, and aerial logging to protect water quality from potential erosion.

TRPA Executive Director Joanne S. Marchetta said, “The Caldor Fire and the surge of megafires in the region are clear directives for us to improve our forest health policies to better protect communities and the environment from wildfire. TRPA is committed to advancing science-based practices that protect the lake and bolster our resilience to ever-growing wildfire threats, especially given the need for fuels reduction work in untreated areas narrowly missed by the Caldor Fire.”

In previous years, in fact in decards, machinery was not allowed on ANY slope over 30%.  This long-standing directive dates back to our own experience here in Incline Village when the former Ski Incline transformed its resort and doubled its terrain back in 1987.  During that year, the expansion (now known as Diamond Peak) was literally built by hand.  And for those of you who have skied the upper mountain, you can only imagine how the crews had to dig the holes for the lift towers, remove vegetation, and build structures at the top of the Peak.

The story adds another visual to the challenge at hand:

The policy change will facilitate additional forest health projects on steeper slopes. Approximately 61,000 acres in the Tahoe Basin have slopes from 30 to 50 percent, and nearly half of that area is in wildland-urban interface defense and threat zones near communities where hand crews continue to work. Additionally, post-fire assessments of the Caldor Fire show that steeper slopes tended to burn at higher severity than other areas.

“This is a game-changer for fuels reduction in the basin,” Chief Scott Lindgren of Tahoe Douglas Fire Protection District said. “Hilly terrain is a significant portion of the Tahoe Basin and with the right kind of equipment, we can do quality fuel reduction work and protect the environment at the same time.”

Our team at Borelli Architecture applauds the TRPA and all who are focused on a healthier, safer, future for the entire region.  If you are interested in learning more about their year-round efforts to preserve, restore, and enhance the unique natural and human environment of the Lake Tahoe Region, contact Jeff Cowen, Public Information Officer, at (775) 589-5278 or jcowen@trpa.gov.

If you would like a personal insight about the TRPA, securing building permits in Tahoe, and other key initiatives that are key to starting to build a home in the Tahoe basin Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

Borelli Architecture Tapped to Design Homes in Clear Creek Tahoe

Borelli Architecture Designs Homes In Clear Creek Tahoe Carson City

Borelli Architecture Designs Homes In Clear Creek Tahoe Carson City

In our last News post, we announced the opening of Clear Creek Tahoe’s new 20,000 SF Clubhouse.  This magnificent amenity is yet another exceptional reason why families throughout America are heading west or east to the High Sierra to live a life wrapped with some of the finest recreation assets that anyone could ask for.

Promoting the resort as “A Natural Wonder,” the developers had a vision in mind that is now coming together as a community that is second to none.  As their website states:

Clear Creek is on the eastern slope of the Carson Range, conveniently just about 20 minutes from both Incline Village and the ski slopes of Heavenly. Yet it is spectacularly unspoiled – 2,136 acres surrounded by the six million acres of the largest national forest in the lower 48. Your home will be a natural refuge … forever. Clear Creek is also reassuringly private – a private community and club since inception.”

With over 280 homesites either purchased or under construction, our architect firm based in Nevada and close to Carson City is designing homes for those who have staked their claim in this tax-friendly resort.  Here is some of the most recent insight from the developer’s as noted on their website:

Now that people can work where they play, the demand for Clear Creek’s signature properties in our private, gated community is soaring … with more than half in design and development. A number of finished residences are move-in ready. Now, we’re thrilled to release some of our most spectacular homesites — the Mountain Estates North — a select offering of homesites unique to Clear Creek, with sweeping vistas of the mountains. Homesites are spacious, and the real estate land plan is deliberately uncrowded to maximize views and privacy for our members as they craft their ultimate mountain getaways.

Borelli Architecture Designing Homes in Clear Creek Tahoe Development in Carson City, NV

Our team is on-site quite often and is actively designing homes for several new residents in the Clear Creek development.  Above you will see one of the designs.

This Clear Creek Tahoe project is currently under construction and features a 4,300 square foot 2-story main residence and a detached office/guest house. The main house features a large, open living area with access to an expansive patio area as well as a covered “outdoor room” with kitchen and fireplace. The master bedroom suite and office are located at the east end of the house while the guest wing with 2 guest bedroom suites is located at the west end of the house. A ‘kid’s hangout” is located at the upper floor, complete with tv room, bunkroom and a slide from their own deck to the back yard below.

Clear Creek Homesites for Sale in Nevada

There are just a few homesites left within the resort so if you have any interest, now is the time to stake your own claim in Nevada.

If you would like a personal tour of what is, without question, THE place to work or retire, I would be happy to show you the options at any time. Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in the Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

New Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe Now Open

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

Clear Creek Tahoe Golf Resort Development at Lake Tahoe

(Photo courtesy of Clear Creek Tahoe and Chase International – Listing Real Estate Office)

On behalf of Borelli Architecture firm at Lake Tahoe and Carson City, Nevada, we are sending out our congratulations to our friends at Clear Creek Tahoe in Carson City.  This past month they announced the Grand Opening of their new 20,000 SF Clubhouse.

In a recent article in the Tahoe Daily Tribune, General Manager Milward Bell-Bhatti quoted:

“Now more than ever, our community seeks connection, and we couldn’t be more excited to introduce the Clear Creek Clubhouse to meet this need. We focused on the pillars that set our community apart, from culinary to wellness and golf, with spaces appropriately both grand and intimate to celebrate life in the mountains and provides a legacy environment for our members active Tahoe lifestyle.”

If you have ever wanted to live a life that included year-round recreation steps from your porch, this prestigious development on the eastern edge of the High Sierra offers its own golf course and private beach house on the edge of Lake Tahoe.  In addition, the new Clubhouse offers the following features and amenities:

Highlights of the new Clubhouse at Clear Creek Tahoe include:

  • A stone hearth and fireplace —the ideal spot to warm up
  • Outdoor dining areas, complete with a fire pit and stunning views
  • Terraces for lounging that overlook our beautiful golf course with dramatic rock outcroppings in the background
  • A welcoming dining room complete with fireplace and vaulted windows that overlooks the 18th green and the Event Lawn
  • A pub and lounge just off the dining room for light snacks, cocktails, and that all-important recap of the day’s golf game
  • Fitness room with the latest cardio equipment and weights, a movement studio, a spin studio, and a refreshment station
  • Locker rooms thoughtfully designed around gathering and socializing, with generous wet areas and steam rooms
  • Single and couples’ treatment rooms for massage and other body work

At this time, Borelli Architecture is designing several homes within the resort and is in contract with a few other residents who have chosen to live a full and active life at Clear Creek.

Lots are still available for sale – yet there are not many left to purchase.

If you would like a personal tour of what is, without question, THE place to work or retire, I would be happy to show you the options at any time. Feel free to reach out to our architect firm in the Lake Tahoe, Carson City, and Reno region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Winter Driving Safety Tips

Winter Driving Tips

With all the recent snowfall, we continue to encourage our friends and family to be cautious as they come and go to enjoy the grandeur of Lake Tahoe. Whether you have lived in the Tahoe Basin for a long time or are new to the High Sierra, it’s always a good thing to refresh yourself about how to drive through safely in and around our mountainous roads.

For a fresh look at the best advice, we dove into the Nevada Department of Transportation’s website. We found this informative list in their numerous stories about traffic safety, road conditions and webcams for roads in Nevada, and construction updates.

Before you head out to the slopes or trails, or just head to the local stores to stock up on supplies, we encourage you to review this list from NDOT’s news section:

Winter Driving Safety Tips (courtesy of the Nevada Department of Transportation)

 Winter driving safety tips are available at dot.nv.gov/winter.

  • Only travel in winter weather when necessary, leave enough time to safely reach your destination and plan your route to help avoid snowy/icy areas and steep hills.
  • Before driving, check weather and road conditions by dialing 511 within Nevada (or 1-877-NV-ROADS outside of Nevada) or logging on to www.nvroads.com.
  • Share your travel itinerary so others know when to expect you.
  • Remove snow and ice from all vehicle windows, mirrors, lights, turn signals and license plates.
  • Buckle up.
  • Turn on headlights to see and be seen.
  • Do not rely solely on GPS to find alternate routes, as it could lead to unmaintained roadways or hazardous areas.
  • Turn off cruise control.
  • Avoid quick starts, stops and fast turns. Accelerate, brake and steer smoothly and gradually.
  • Reduce speed. Speed limits are based on normal road and weather conditions, not winter road conditions.
  • Do not slam on the brakes. Apply steady pressure on ABS-equipped (antilock braking system) vehicles and pump the brakes if necessary on non-ABS vehicles.
  • Always comply with all posted traction device requirements.
  • If your vehicle has snow tires, install and use them between October 1 and April 30.
  • Keep extra distance from other vehicles.
  • Watch carefully for snow removal equipment.
  • Do not pass without reasonable distance and sight clearance.
  • Use extra caution on bridges, ramps, overpasses and shaded areas- they may freeze first.
  • Maintain a high fuel level.
  • If the vehicle begins to skid, steer in the direction of the slide and slowly remove the foot from the accelerator.
  • Be aware of black ice.
  • If parked or stuck in the snow, leave a window slightly cracked for ventilation and ensure the vehicle exhaust system is clear of snow.
    Check before you go:
    Tires    Brakes    Lights    Battery     Wipers    Defroster   Heater   Vehicle Fluid Levels
    Carry with you:
    Tire chains     Flashlight    Ice scraper    Snow shovel     First-aid supplies
    Extra clothes/gloves   Blanket     Flares    Non-perishable food/water

In the meantime, if you want more details about what it is like to live in the mountains or have thought about building a home in Truckee or Lake Tahoe, feel free to reach out at any time. Our family at Borelli Architecture has been living and working in the Sierra for over 30 years.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How To Shovel Snow From Your Roof?

How to shovel snow from a roof?

With record snowfall breaking all the records for December in Lake Tahoe, our architect firm in Truckee and Lake Tahoe is getting calls about snow removal … from the roof.  Although we certainly know all about designing mountain homes that meet the structural requirements for significant snowfall like we are experienceing today, when it come to the question about how to remove snow from the rooftops, we refer our clients to professionals who know how to safely get the job done.

To help you start your own research on the subject, we found an excellent article posted on State Farm Insurance’s website.

Here are the highlights of the story posed by the question “How do you know if you have too much snow on the roof?”

One cubic foot of fluffy, dry snow weighs about three pounds. The same amount of dense, wet snow can weigh as much as 21 pounds. While most roofs are built to withstand more than that, your roof may be under too much pressure if you see these signs:

  • Visible sagging along the roofline
  • Cracks in the ceiling or on the walls
  • Popping or creaking noises
  • Difficult-to-open doors and windows

As it melts excess snow can also lead to ice dams — melting snow refreezes and can damage your home’s interior under the eave line.

How to safely clear your roof

Keep the following in mind:

  • Hire a professional. A person who does this work regularly should know the best techniques and likely be insured.
  • Never work alone. Always have someone with you in case you slip or have an emergency.
  • Clear the area. The ladder up to your roof should be positioned on solid ground. Also, make sure the rungs are clear of ice and snow before you climb.
  • Secure yourself. If possible, use a strap or belt to anchor yourself to something strong, like a chimney.
  • Avoid shingle damage. Stay away from picks, hammers, or other sharp tools to clear snow and ice.
  • Use the right tools. If you have a one-story or flat-roofed house, invest in a snow rake. These long-handled tools with plastic blades can help you gently pull snow from the edge of the roof line.

Inasmuch as this is a good recap of how to get the job done, our team at Borelli Architecture suggests you seek professionals to get the job done.  Roofing companies and possibly professional tree removal companies would be a good place to start.  Here’s a link to the Better Business Bureau’s recommendations. 

In the meantime, if you want more details about how to build a structurally sound home in the mountains, feel free to reach out at any time.

Happy New Year!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Top Tips for the Perfect Workspace and Environment

Trends in workplace design

Trends in workplace design by Borelli Architecture

Throughout the year, we like to keep our clients up to date on business and architectural design trends.  And this news posting is yet another opportunity to share a business story that was recently posted in the Reno Gazette Journal re: American’s could be working from home until spring of 2022.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have included some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.  All of which are assets that came to play within the RGJ story.

I’ll now share some of their insight (see information in italics) about workplace statistics and a few tips on how to keep the ‘art of working at home’ working for you in 2022.

How long will the ‘work from home’ directive last? 

When the coronavirus outbreak first erupted and workers were told to pack up their desks and prepare to do their jobs from home, many companies assumed they’d uphold that arrangement for a handful of weeks. Back then, no one could’ve predicted that 18 months later, a large chunk of the U.S. workforce would still be working remotely.  Earlier this summer, big-name companies started firming up plans to have staff members return to office buildings – some on a partial basis, and some on a full-time basis. But then, the delta variant hit, and since then, those same companies have had to walk back their plans and postpone their reopenings.

Facebook, for example, is delaying its office return until January of 2022. Apple initially postponed its reopening to October but has since moved it back even further to match Facebook’s timeline. And now, it’s looking like remote work easily has the potential to last two solid years.

Tips to  ‘feel right at home’ while working at home

Give yourself a break.  We have found that our team can get so focused on designing mountain homes that we forget to breathe.  As such, ew now set alarms every half hour to remind ourselves to stop and smell the roses – so to speak.  It never ceases to amaze me how a short break can help one’s mind regroup.

Save some ‘body’ time.  Within our architect design firm, we work with several of the region’s finer new communities.  And many times were are on site.  During that time, we make time to get out and take a short walk in between meetings.  Be it on the links at Clear Creek Development in Carson City or throughout the beautiful neighborhood of St. James’ Place in Reno, NV, there’s always an excellent opportunity to stretch the legs and take in the mountain scenery.

Schedule an actual lunch break.  Back in the day, when we worked in our office, there was always someone talking about where they would go for lunch.  Today, it’s a bit different as our kitchen is steps from our interior design firm and architect company in Nevada.

Get comfy, yet not too comfy.  Article after article that we read about tips for the perfect workspace and environment note that wearing sweats and t-shirts may be comfortable, they apparently have a way of making humans too lazy.  One article actually noted that the best thing to wear is pants with a tight waistband. It reminds us to keep away from the tempting snacks and daily pizza routine.

Top tips for an ideal workspace design.

Above you will see a home that our architecture firm in Lake Tahoe is working on as we speak.  You will see that within this design, we have includes some key features to keep the home/work environment light, bright, and efficient as well.

Our favorite part of this particular ‘workspace design’ includes a porch and a large sliding glass door that offers some spectacular lake views. In addition to the desk component, you will see that we have added ‘room to relax,” a good sound system, and plenty of storage to keep the area fresh and tidy.

If you have been working from home and feel like it’s time to remodel your office, or other spaces throughout your home, our team at Borelli Architecture would be happy to share some of the ideas that we have already implemented in properties throughout Incline Village, Truckee, Lake Tahoe, and the greater Reno/Carson City region.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Top Reasons to Move to Nevada

Over 30 years ago, I started my architectural firm in Lake Tahoe.  As time went on, fortune followed as hundreds of my clients decided to leave the city life and head to the High Sierra.  Lucky for all of them, and my wife and I, we still love the decision we made so many years ago.

I was reminded of this fate while reading a story in the ‘about why Nevada is such a great place to live.  The article was written by Journalist Brett McGuinness is entitled: Why I Am Thankful to be a Nevadan. Here are some of the highlights that we thought you might enjoy reading and/or sharing with your friends and family.

Nevada is a great place to call home.  Why? Here’s what Brett had to say, as noted in the italics below.

1) Wide Open Space

More than 3 million people live in the Silver State. That’s slightly fewer residents than Iowa and slightly more than Arkansas, putting us at No. 33 out of 50 states, population-wise. Pre-pandemic numbers ranked Nevada as the third-most-visited state in the country, trailing only California and Florida. Everyone in America knows Nevada. And international tourists know us, too … mainly because of Las Vegas, but still.

2) It can be lonely, and that’s a good thing

If you love personal space, there are few spots on the planet with fewer humans than Nevada: just 28.5 people per square mile… if you were blindfolded, strapped into a parachute, and shoved out of an airplane, and your first thought upon landing is “Where is everybody?” there’s a good chance you’re in Nevada.

3) There’s a lot of ‘horsing around

If you have time, head down to the old south Reno area and poke into the neighborhoods off of NV 341 (on your way to Virginia City).  In addition to viewing some of the old architectural designs of homes built in the late 1960s and 1970s, you will likely see horses roaming around in the neighborhoods?  As Brett noted:

But how many places have wild horses hanging out on front lawns? It’s worth the occasional cleanup just so we can post horse pictures to social media and astound all our out-of-state friends.

4) Rock stars love it here

You know who’s on stage this weekend in Reno?  Multi-platinum rock group Cheap Trick, Emmy-nominated comedy writer Demetri Martin and Grammy-winning comedian Lewis Black.  Do you know who’s on stage in Mobile and Huntsville?

5) And there are endless stars to see

Because of the whole no-people-having situation, Nevada also has some of the best stargazing sites in the world. Among them are the International Dark Sky Park in northeastern Nevada’s Great Basin National Park and the Dark Sky Sanctuary at northwestern Nevada’s Massacre Rim. These sites are so free from light pollution, the stars themselves are literally bright enough to cast shadows. 

6) We’re friendly, and very tax-friendly as well

The list of reasons why one should move their family OR their business to Nevada is too long for this short news clip.  Yet for the full details, visit the Economic Development Authority of Nevada and read on!

So there you are.  If you have plans to move to Nevada and build a home, or purchase a home and need an architect to help you remodel your investment, do reach out to our team.  Our team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village and Lake Tahoe has been providing advice about the best reasons to move to Nevada for decades and would be happy to share our insight with you.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

Examples of Homes with Remodeled Gas and Wood Stoves

Wood and Gas Stove Remodeling Tips

Every year at Borelli Architecture, we seem to have clients who seek our ideas on how to remodel their homes to upgrade their gas or wood stoves.   As this is a popular subject, and with winter already in full focus at Lake Tahoe, we decided to share some of the h0mes we have remodeled to include an upgraded wood and/or gas stove.

Below you will find a few examples.

Wood and Gas Stove Remodeling Tips

Wood Stove Upgrade, Remodeled Lakefront Home

In the far corner of this lakefront property, you will see a classic old wood stove that served its purpose for many years.  Within the larger photo, you can see what a beautiful difference a home remodel can make to the ambiance, as well as the value, of this Crystal Shores condominium in Incline Village, NV.  Our Borelli Architecture firm in Lake Tahoe worked with our clients to ensure their vision of a “living room with a mountain style” came to life.

To see additional photographs of this lakefront home remodel in Lake Tahoe, follow this link.

Gas Stove Remodel Ideas

Here is another fine example.  In the photo on the far left corner, you can see that there was no fireplace at all.  Through our architectural design services in Tahoe, we completely changed the ambiance of this home on Dee Court in Incline Village.  The gas fireplace is now a centerpiece of the Great Room which serves as the main gathering area for the family during the winter months, and all year long.

For more insight about the other rooms that we remodeled throughout this home in Incline Village, click on our website now.

Fireplace Remodeling Ideas

Above you will see one more example of what a simple home remodel can make when you include a cozy gas (or wood) fireplace.  The owners of this condominium in Incline Village selected this fireplace for two reasons:  warmth, and as an accent to their mountain-themed living room.

So where do you start to find the best selection of gas or wood stoves in Lake Tahoe?  First and foremost, we always encourage our clients to “Keep the money on the mountain” for whatever they are looking for.  When it comes to stoves?  Go see Randy at Woodstove Distributors on the main drag in Incline Village.

When you are ready to take a look at all the options that are out in the market for replacing your wood or gas stove, and thinking about a home remodel in Lake Tahoe, feel free to reach out to Borelli Architecture to get your vision underway.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060