What to Do if You Come Across a Downed Power Line?

I recently read an article that was published in a local newspaper in Flathead Lake, MT.  Their weather mirrors ours throughout each season.  Recently they experienced some extremely high winds that downed trees throughout the east side of the Lake.  With so much destruction, the Flathead Lake Electric Cooperative decided they should jump onto to an education program to help locals and visitors alike be better prepared for falling power lines.

With the winter season around the corner, we can certainly expect to see a return of the classic High Sierra winds that are just part of living in the majestic Lake Tahoe and Truckee regions. Right here in our architecture firm in Incline Village, NV, we sit on top of a ridge where we can experience some pretty good gusts this time of the year, and into the winter months as well.

The article included some very good information, complete with visuals, that can be used universally – no matter where you live on the planet.

As we design mountain homes in Truckee, Lake Tahoe, and especially the Carson Valley that gets the brunt of the wind, we always review the electrical lines and carefully position our homes within a safe distance – should any lines go down.

If you have recently purchased a lot on which to build a home, or have plans to remodel or expand your footprint, our team at our architecture firm in Washoe County, NV, would be pleased to come by to review your situation and its existing electrical layout.

In the meantime, feel free to share the following artwork that is courtesy of the Flathead Lake Electric Cooperative.

Stay safe out there!

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

 

 

 

Your Input Sought for New Tahoe Transportation Plan

It’s a sheer delight to bring you good news today from our architectural office in Lake Tahoe/Truckee.  this past week, the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency posted a link to its Transporation Plan which is now available for your review and input. The plan addressed recreation and scenic resources, water and air quality, and other important issues.

For those of us who have lived in the area for years, this is a great opportunity to provide advice based on our years of experience of living in the High Sierra.

For those who are new to the region, it’s also a terrific way to share your experience as a new resident to the region.

To get you started, click into the TRPA Transportation Plan right here.

According to a news article, over 8,500 individuals were involved in creating the plan.  Insight was also obtained from what they have called a ‘bi-state’ consultation group that is involved in transportation.  This partnership included the California Natural Resources Agency and the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

According to TRPA, “Tahoe’s transportation system should meet the daily needs of transit‐dependent riders and employees, make it easier for recreational travelers to use transit and assure visitors they can get around without their cars.”

The post offered more details to what you will read about within the Transportation Plan

Transit: Adding services to provide 15‐minute service between town centers and recreation destinations, 30‐to 60‐minute service between neighborhoods and town centers, and inter‐regional service for commuters and visitors from neighboring regions.

Technology: Connecting people with information about the many ways to travel around the region, providing better data and analysis, and ensuring charging facilities are available for electric vehicles.

Trails: Increasing trips by foot and bike by providing through walking and biking routes.

Communities and Corridors: Bringing plan elements together with a corridor planning framework connecting workers to jobs, visitors to recreation, and residents to town centers, housing, and recreation.

Public hearings will be held at the end of September and beginning of October. The plan will be considered for adoption by the agency governing boards in November.

If you want more details, or to make your comments heard, connect with Michelle Glickert at mglickert@trpa.org.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

How to Prepare Your Home for Evacuation

This past month, and this week in particular, has seen more fires than ever recorded throughout the west.  In an effort to help us all be prepared, I am sharing this recent article written by Tia Rancourt, Public Education/Information Officer, for the North Lake Tahoe Fire District.

If you would like more information, please contact her directly at 775-813-8106, trancourt@nltfpd.net

WEATHER & FIRE SAFETY INFORMATION – PREPARING FOR FIRE EVACUATION

(Credit to Tia Rancourt, NLRFD, July 20, 2020)

As we have been experiencing lately, fires started by lightning peak in the summer months and in the late afternoon and early evening. Know what to do to keep you and your family safe when storms strike.

  • If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance of lightning. Look for shelter inside a home, large building, or a hard-topped vehicle right away.
  • Do not go under trees for shelter. There is no place outside that is safe during a thunderstorm.
  • Wait at least 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder before leaving your shelter.
  • Stay away from windows and doors. Stay off porches.
  • There is no safe place outside. Places with only a roof on sports fields, golf courses, and picnic areas are not safe during a lightning storm. Small sheds should not be used.
  • If a person is struck by lightning, call 9-1-1. Get medical help right away.

Facts & figures from National Fire Protection Association:

  • During 2007-2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 22,600 fires started by lightning. These fires caused annual averages of
    • 9 civilian deaths
    • 53 civilian injuries
    • $451 million in direct property damage
  • Fires started by lightning peak in the summer months and in the late afternoon and early evening.
  • For more information on lightning safety please visit www.nfpa.org.

Please keep in mind that with the drier than normal conditions this summer, it is important to create and maintain defensible space around your home. Visit tahoelivingwithfire.com for more information and “Fight fire with a plan.”

Prepare your family, property, and possessions now before a wildfire starts by creating a plan:

  • Develop a family evacuation plan
  • Create and maintain defensible space
  • Assemble a Go-bag and a disaster supply kit for your home and vehicle
  • Sign up for emergency notifications for residents and visitors and stay informed
  • Reduce the threat of wildfire by learning about embers and how to harden your home. Attend the free virtual Tahoe Home Retrofit Workshop on July 28, 2020. Visit bit.ly/TahoeRetrofit to pre-register

If you plan on water recreation activities on Lake Tahoe, please remember the temperature can be colder than most, as it is an Alpine lake. Whether boating, jet skiing, kayaking, rafting, paddle boarding or swimming, it is important to inform yourself about the colder temperatures and the forecasted weather as it can change very quickly, please visit National Weather Service.

On behalf of our entire team at Borelli Architecture in Incline Village on Lake Tahoe’s North Shore, we encourage you to take preventative measures as noted above.  Be safe.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060

Impressive Lake Tahoe Environmental Restoration Projects In Motion

Throughout our news postings our architecture firm at Lake Tahoe likes to share information about our environmental issues that are impacting the land in which we live.  Today, we want to bring you up to speed on some of the more significant projects that are being funded and organized through TahoeFund.org.

Before we get to the specifics, let me enlighten you about the purpose of this fine organization.  As noted on their website:

“The Tahoe Fund was founded in 2010 as a registered nonprofit in the States of  Nevada and California. The goal of the Tahoe Fund is to become a major source of private funding for environmental projects around the Lake Tahoe Basin with an emphasis on forest health, lake clarity, sustainable recreation, transportation and stewardship. They provide a common vision from which to build a sustainable future for this irreplaceable resource and for those who cherish and enjoy this mountain landscape.

Lake Tahoe lies within two states, five counties and hosts an extensive network of local, state and federal agencies. Tahoe Fund programs directly benefit a population base of 40,000 full-time residents and 20 million visitors to the Basin.”

Per their mission above, right now they are involved some interesting and significant projects.  I’ll show you the highlights and then offer links to their stories so you can read more about the projects at hand.

Tyrolian Mountain Bike Trail Restoration

My wife, Kelly, and I enjoy mountain biking from our home in Incline Village.  One of our favorite trails to test our tenacity is the popular Tyrolian Village trail which is just above a few homes that our architecture firm in Tahoe has remodeled in this quaint European-style community.   There’s a terrific group of organizations that have joined forces to repair, restore, and renovate what used to be quite a challenging mountain bike trek.  We send our appreciation now to those who are investing their time, talent, and treasure to remove the old timbers that caused endless bike enthusiast to take a tumble or two.

Smartest Forest Fund

With our summer wrapped within another wild wildfire season, we are looking forward to seeing the results of this very significant project.  Entitled “Smartest Forest Fund,” this program includes several initiatives to repair, replant, and restore our forests throughout the Lake Tahoe basin.   Highlights from their website note its goals:

-The Smartest Forest will dramatically decrease the time it takes to plan and approve restoration work.

-The Smartest Forest will use technology to enhance wildlife studies and harvesting plans.

-The Smartest Forest will find new outlets for the excess fuel in the forest.

-The Smartest Forest will prepare our community for wildfire evacuation.

-The Smartest Forest will find new financial tools to do more work more quickly.

Drink Tahoe Tap

Did you know that our tap water in Incline was voted as the best tasting water in the country?  True story.  And in an effort for locals and visitors alike to continually drink our tap water, and leave their plastic bottles at bay, the Tahoe Water Supply Association is offering the opportunity for local businesses to install new Water Bottle Refill Stations.

Available on a first-come basis, grants will be offered to Basin businesses who fill out the application, install the water bottle refill stations and submit proof of installation and payment between August 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021.
Here’s the application with all the information you need to get one of these environmentally-friendly devices that offer safe and tasty water to all who visit your establishment.
As always, we encourage you to get involved in our community to help protect our piece of paradise.

James P. Borelli
Founder/Principal
Borelli Architecture
Lake Tahoe / Truckee
jim@borelliarchitecture.com
775.831.3060